Dima Gavrysh is a blast from my agency past, one of many photographers who I ran into through being at my day job, ClampArt. Dima has a completely and wonderfully different photojournalism life than that with which I associate him. Graduating from Rhode Island School of Design in 2012, Dima has been photographing multiple projects around the globe, including collaborations with Doctors Without Borders and the United Nations Population Fund. Dima has also been embedded several times with the US Army in Afghanistan. Here are some of his Soldiers of Zerok, "a portrait series exploring personalities of the US soldiers stationed at a remote combat outpost on the Afghan-Pakistani border."





All images © Dima Gavrysh


© Statia Grossman

You're allergic. I get it.

Totally worth a second entry, Statia Grossman's heart-rending yet entertaining project catalogs a bunch of the shit her partner left behind when he walked out. Head over to her Tumblr and show some support.


See no ex. Hear no ex. Speak no ex.


This Lacie underwear


How you gonna manscape now Mr. Metrosexual?

Click here for the previous post.

All images © Statia Grossman


Buckminster Fuller, 1980 © Yousuf Karsh

Life.com published a piece about Buckminster Fuller today and I fancied showing this gorgeous Karsh portrait of the fascinating architect, inventor and futurist. In the 'Life' article it quotes Bucky saying "I did not set out to design a geodesic dome, I set out to discover the principles operative in Universe. For all I knew, this could have led to a pair of flying slippers."


Patrick Fraser emailed to tell me about his 'Parada' series which "came about from a road trip through Uruguay earlier this year. I started noticing different structures along the roadside and seeing the sign 'Parada' nearby - paradas are bus shelters.
Then I noticed people waiting and decided that this was a story about transience, character, patience, and landscape. Documenting paradas became a way of seeing the country and its inhabitants in a simple photographic essay." 


Patrick has an anthropological eye - among several projects on his website, check out the series 'This is Britain.'







All images © Patrick Fraser

Thebez 506578-5232270-Together_ROUGH4.jpg

Laying it bare in a limited edition book, Alex Thebez brings us his project 'When We Are Together.' Not too self-indulgent, this is the most charming book of personal work I've received lately. (And the purple cover is texturally really nice...) Check out some other work by this sweet, young experimentalist.


Thebez PageImage-506578-5232275-Together_ROUGH9.jpg
"Hello, my name is Alex.

These photos I am showing you are of my family and this boy that I dated for a while, until recently.

The photos are taken in a few different places over a period of four years or so.

I spent most of my adult life being away from my family.
I started living alone, abroad, when I was fourteen. I see them during vacations or holidays.
We would take trips together as a family sometimes.

Most of my family still don't know that I like boys."






"The first time I entered this world, I was totally ignorant to pot farming, and riddled with judgment. It took some time for my outsider eyes to adjust to see what was all around me - behind locked gates and camouflaged cabins, past generators and barking dogs, protective firearms and diesel trucks - but also to gain the trust of the community. It is an eclectic group, bound together by a deep knowledge of growing techniques, along with a strong distrust for outsiders; suspicion is a necessary survival trait. These farmers are lured by the single magical and medicinal plant; a plant whose cultivation or possession holds the promise of profit, coupled with possible jail time. As state and local laws, along with public acceptance, are now changing, this once-furtive farming community is coming out of its greenhouses, building bigger ones and growing giant plants in full sun, less fearful of the hum of helicopters, more exposed and confident than ever before."


Your dirty laundry.

In an ongoing personal project just released on Statia's Tumblr, the photographer finds catharsis through a really well-executed series that most of us can relate to. Go ahead and share the shaming!

"He broke my heart and left. He also left a lot of his shit in my apartment. I photographed it all before tossing it. Hell hath no fury like a woman photographer scorned."


Shit that the Salvation Army got.


I assume it's shitty if you left it here.


Your tight hipster sweatshirt. Hope I didn't stretch this shit out.


Your glory days.


Did I mention that he broke up with me right after my birthday? This one goes out to your shitty timing.


I found the perfect key for you.



All images © Statia Grossman


Tying in slightly with Fleur Alston's project depicting landscapes where battles and hangings and invasions and such once took place, Neil A. White's project 'Lost Villages' shows homes and rural areas potentially about to become history. 

"The Holderness coast located in the North East of England endures the highest rate of coastal erosion in Europe. The devastating consequence of this is villages and land slowly disappearing into the sea. The 'Lost Villages' project aims to explore the constant battle between the North Sea and the mainland, and to document the irreversible change taking place on the Holderness coast."


"The speed of the erosion has increased significantly in the past decade thanks to rising sea levels, which is linked to climate change. It is estimated that up 32 villages dating back to the Roman times have already been lost to the sea. During World War II many outposts were built on this 61 km stretch of coastline. What remains of these outposts is now falling into the sea."


"The historical events which took place on this coastline are fascinating. Since Roman times it is estimated that a strip of land three and a half miles wide has been washed into the North Sea. Two miles are estimated to have been lost since the Norman invasion in 1066 AD. One lost village, Ravenser Odd, is particularly significant. Described as a mediaeval "new town" founded in 1235, it was also a thriving sea port. By 1346 it was recorded that two thirds of the town and its buildings had been lost to the sea due to erosion. In the years that followed from about 1349 to 1360, the sea had completely destroyed Ravensor Odd."


"The 'Lost Villages' project will continue to document the erosion of the Holderness coastline and the difficulties experienced by the people, who are quite literally living on the edge there. In just over a year of working on this project, I have seen the coastline change markedly right before my eyes. This really does bring the speed of the erosion into reality."



All images © Neil A. White


© Victoria Trevino

An update on the second contest over at LifeFramer. Photographer Olivia Bee judged last month's theme, "An Instant," and the winning image is this one by Victoria Trevino. 

Short listed is this image by Alessandro Falco, whose work I became familiar with last year when I judged the Grand Prix de Découverte. I love his eye!


© Alessandro Falco

The current theme is "A Human Touch" and will be judged by Julia Fullerton-Batten. It's $10 a punt for a $400 prize, along with an exhibition and other bits and pieces such as potential publicity in photography blogs! Deadline is May 31st.


It was lovely to have the opportunity to attend the NYU Photography and Imaging thesis students' portfolio review recently. I saw the work of five of the most confident youngsters I've ever critiqued, each with something interesting going on. I connected with all of them, but it's Andrew who has followed up on my request for a copy of the cheese couch from his cheese-melted-on-plastic-toys series... We discussed the unlikely nature of the American cheese slice and its reluctance to melt at the edges. 

His thesis project, however, is about human interaction with LCD screens, as seen below in this panorama of the artist's parents. Love the art work!


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