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© Christine Burrill, courtesy 151ArtsBrownstone

'Uprising Los Angeles' features photo collages made by Christine Burrill, a Los Angeles-based cinematographer and photographer. Being hosted by a new arts space in Harlem, 151ArtsBrownstone, the exhibition highlights Burrill's images of the aftermath of the 1992 LA riots. The exhibition is being held in honor of the 20th anniversary of the events that took place following the Rodney King trial.

"Burrill began working with photo collage after she read an article on David Hockney in The New Yorker in 1983. She was taken with his methods and set out to replicate what he called "separate glimpses" of the same subject. Burrill's impressive photo collages are made up of over a hundred 4x6 images that have been layered digitally then printed as a single image on archival paper. The exhibition presents a range of subject matter­­­: would-be gang girls flashing victory signs, empty shells of stores, elegant African-American churchgoers displaying resolve after Sunday service, a Korean family sweeping up the remains of their store, and a dismayed Latino cop standing quietly among by wreckage. The images feel remarkably current, invoking the pathos, and lurking potential, for violence in communities plagued by injustice."

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© Christine Burrill, courtesy 151ArtsBrownstone

'Uprising Los Angeles' opens on Thursday, October 11th and will remain on view through December 2nd.

Karsh_Rank.jpgBong! Who knows why I woke up today with the Rank gong in my head but here we are. Lord J. Arthur Rank aka 1st Baron Rank was a British industrialist and film producer, and founder of the Rank Organization, and he established Pinewood Studios where my once-fabulous photo agency was based for a couple of years. This photograph may well have been taken there.











J. Arthur Rank, 1949 © Yousuf Karsh


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Rob Hann © Dan Cruz

This is further to my previous post in conjunction with my fellow bloggers, led by Jorg Colberg and Colin Pantall, encouraging our network to nominate "photographers who have demonstrated an openness to use new ideas in photography, who have taken chances with their photography and have shown an unwillingness to play it safe."

I've known Rob Hann for many years since he was syndicating his photographs of musicians through my agency in England. We've seen different incarnations of each other in that time, and Rob's latest and I think most brilliant is what you see above. His love of the great American road trip and his humourous eye enable him to create an ongoing, thoroughly enjoyable series of photographs. In the last couple of years, the charming Rob can be found on Prince Street in Soho, New York, selling matted prints of his most appealing images in two sizes well under $50. Not only is he selling multiple copies himself at affordable prices, Christiane Celle of Clic Gallery discovered him on Prince and he is now represented by them for fine art prints. Rob is getting to meet all sorts of people, including editors and art directors, and has even picked up a commissioned job. Putting himself literally out there and pimping a product must have been a daunting prospect, but Rob has turned it into a profitable enterprise of which he should be proud. I commend him for not being complacent, not crowd-funding his career, and never, ever moaning about standing on the street all day.

View Rob's first aCurator feature Deserted States of America.

View Rob's second aCurator feature Tucson to Tucumcari.

View Rob's third aCurator feature Lone Star State of Mind.



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Something for the weekend? aCurator favourite Dirk Anschütz will be in DUMBO, Brooklyn, NY.

"Following the popularity of last year's foto/pods deployment, and the runaway success of Photoville, United Photo Industries returns to the DUMBO Arts Festival with foto/pods 2012 - a hamlet of shipping container exhibitions, tents, outdoor projections and much much more along a strip on Main Street, DUMBO."

At Photoville, Dirk's series 'Giddy Up' was laid out among other great work on 'the fence,' and for UPI's next installation, he'll be showing prints from "Upstream Brooklyn," a portrait series of Brooklyners with severe physical and cognitive/developmental disabilities.

I really enjoyed Photoville, and it was a bonus for me that it was spelled with a Ph. But this is a hamlet, so + points for that. Anyway, I love Dirk and Dirk's work so if you're local go check it out.

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News in from our friends at Snap Galleries in London. "In the gallery for the next four weeks, ending 13 October 2012, we'll be displaying a selection of double page spreads from I saw Nick Drake mounted on the walls. We are showing just over 50% of the book up on the walls, life-size, with each spread measuring a whopping 24 x 36 inches / 60 x 90 cm. When you come to the gallery, you get a sense of the scale of this incredible book."

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"Keith Morris's archive is the single most important source of photographs of Nick Drake, with Keith photographing Nick Drake for all three of his albums over a two and a half year period from April 1969 to November 1971. Tragically, Keith died in a scuba diving accident in 2005 but his legacy lives on through his incredible archive of photographs." Read more over at Snap's website.

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Images courtesy Snap Galleries

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© Sean Hawkey

British-based Sean Hawkey is a "documentary photographer and communications consultant who has worked in 40 countries, focusing mainly on development, humanitarian and rights-based issues." aCurator is proud to publish some images from this series he made in Nicaragua.

"Where do all those Olympic gold medals come from? Almost certainly some of the gold comes from mines like these. The gold is mined by people risking their lives, sometimes losing their lives; risking their health, normally losing their health. The gold is processed using the most toxic of substances that find their way into the water that people and animals drink, the air that people breath, and into the soil. These images are just a small example of a vast human and environmental disaster worldwide related to the mining of gold and other precious metals. The miners themselves rarely get much out of it, they mainly manage to get by for a few years, not a bad option in some developing countries. The enormous mining corporations like B2Gold and Gold Corp strike incredibly favourable deals, that many say can only be got with corruption, where they pay perhaps 5% in royalties - this is the case with B2Gold in Nicaragua - so they get great profits for their shareholders; but it is filthy lucre, shameful profit, they leave behind poisoned environments that may never recover, and that doesn't help the people living there. Protestors against this state of affairs are routinely murdered across Latin America... Gives another meaning to winning gold." - Sean Hawkey.


Find Sean on Facebook.



Steve Pyke photographing Buzz Aldrin

Who would not be excited to be on the receiving end of an email like this one from the supreme Steve Pyke?

"Dear Friends, I am writing to introduce you to a project I am involved in with NASA in Houston. It's an exhibition of my portraits of the men that walked on the moon. This is to coincide with the screening there of the documentary Moonbug" by filmmaker Nichola Bruce.

It will be an independent exhibition for NASA's Johnson Space Centre of photography, film and archive of the Apollo astronauts and lunar missions.

"To accompany the project we will be producing a beautiful, limited edition 112-page book of Steve's photographs, together with selected images of original NASA photography within the Fairley Archive, as well as postcards, posters, signed prints of the photographs and signed copies of both the film and soundtrack." (soundtrack by genius Matt Johnson of The The.)




I know it's all a bit fundy lately, but I try to only put quality projects in front of you.

Steve says he's in England digging astronaut portraits out of storage. I'm here to suggest you support the exhibition and accompanying book.  


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Last foot on the moon (Gene Cernan), Houston, 1998 © Steve Pyke

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The Isle of the Dead © Dave Walsh

If you're lucky enough to be in Dublin between now and September 29th, it looks as if you can't miss Dave Walsh's exhibition of polar photographs. As much as I love the back-lit screen, it seems redundant to say these must look spectacular in-person.

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Petermann Glacier

And, Dave's story will add to your appreciation. He emailed me, saying "The images are mostly made on board Greenpeace ships to the Arctic and Antarctica over the last decade - but rather than being about activism, per se, they're more about how we idealize exotic, far away places. As the press release below says, my ethereal photographs of the unforgiving wilderness, wild animals and blue icebergs question our romantic relationship with remote, harsh and pristine environments. The images resonate with a quiet tension; all may not be right in the Garden of Eden."

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Iceberg Cemetery

In the press release for the exhibition, at The Copper House Gallery, Walsh goes on to say, "While the frozen regions of our planet have the power to ignite imaginations, for most of the seven billion people on Earth, the Arctic and Antarctic remain abstract and unreachable. I've been lucky enough to voyage north and south by ship, to experience the serenity of the oceans and polar regions - and realise how finite our planet is."

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Sleeping Giant

"Rapid change is taking place at the poles; CO2 emissions are contributing to the loss of Arctic sea ice, and melting ice caps are fueling sea level rise. We are starting to grasp how badly we are fouling the nest, and how our acts have repercussions elsewhere. The future of the Arctic and Antarctic is intertwined with our own - through my photography, I want to make people not only fall in love with their home planet, but to start giving a damn and to take action to protect it."

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Arctic Tern Hovering

So, shout-out to Dubliners! Go see!

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Sleeping Walrus All images © Dave Walsh

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From 'Deep in a Dream' © Michael Massaia

Jörg Colberg reached out to some of us photo bloggers asking if we would nominate photographers for an initiative to show those "who have demonstrated an openness to use new ideas in photography, who have taken chances with their photography and have shown an unwillingness to play it safe."

I've been watching Michael Massaia for at least a couple of years ever since his work was recommended to me by photographer Baron Wolman. Before deciding when and what to publish, I eyed him as he produced several quite gorgeous and diverse series, each photographed on film on a large format camera in the middle of the night. A humble character, as an artist who spends hours alone both shooting and developing his own, large platinum prints might have to be, Michael's dry humour creeps in to the otherwise-quiet work - for an artist who produces such considered, serious photographs, his emails have me in stitches. Michael is genuinely self-effacing, but he is a discerning and determined self-promoter, who I feel is as-yet under-appreciated.

My nomination is not so much about new ideas, rather the complete opposite of so much photography that dashes past our eyeballs daily. Who else these days would say their photography is about "managing failure"? Massaia is married to "the importance of creating something from start to finish, by hand." He is lonely when the sun comes up and the joggers come out, preferring to be harried by rats, hassled in the Rambles, threatened in the suburbs, or wading into Central Park pond at 4 am. Truly an off-line, analog guy, unwilling to play the games of the 21st century.

Check out the other people in the network writing about their choices over at Colin Pantall's blog. See Michael talk about his art in a recent post. More here later this week.

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"Patron" Hillbilly Ranch, Boston, Massachusetts, 1972 © Henry Horenstein, courtesy of Horenstein and ClampArt


I am pleased to present a small selection of images from Henry Horenstein's 'Honky Tonk: Portraits of Country Music.' As you can see, I went with a selection of people on the periphery, but you can also see some big-name country music stars at ClampArt, NYC, where the exhibition is on now through October 13th, and online, in conjunction with Henry's latest book of the same title.

"Some say the 1970s were the last great decade of country music - between the pomade, plaid jackets, and goofy hillbilly jokes of the 1950s and the more polished 'Urban Cowboy' sound of Nashville in the early 1980s. Horenstein's work captures it all, from the roadside seediness of TJ's Lounge to the backstage glamour at the Grand Ole Opry. From bluegrass festivals and country music parks to the honky tonks and dance halls, these images picture such celebrities as Dolly Parton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Waylon Jennings, up to a recent cardboard cut-out of Garth Brooks (which speaks volumes about the artist's personal opinion of the direction the genre has taken of late). However, the photographs feature not only the stars, but also include the familiar venues and enthusiastic fans who sustain them."

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

Full disclosure: I am now working at ClampArt and thrilled to be in a position to work with artists such as Henry, and others who have been published here in the past, not least of all one of my favourites, Lori Nix.

Submissions to aCurator are still thoroughly encouraged!

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