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© Stefania Notizia

Italian photographer Stefania Notizia is educating us this week. The Turkish Yörüks live in the eastern part of Macedonia. The Yörüks are referred to as nomadic tribes of Turkmen origin who had emigrated from the steppes of Central Asia to Anatolia, and from there, in several waves, settled the eastern part of the Balkans. Their name derives from the Turkish verb yürü-, which means "to walk".

According to an essay by Elizabeta Koneska, ethnologist at Museum of Macedonia, Skopje, they were first noted in the Balkan region by the end of the 14th century. Their gradual immigration went on during the 15th century, it intensified by the first half of the 16th century and concluded by the end of the 16th century. "The opinion prevailing among most researchers suggests that the migration of these nomadic-farming tribes mostly had to do with the conquering ambitions of the Ottoman Empire."  

First, view the full-screen magazine photo feature. Then, read more on Stefania's website
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"Accident Series" © Zeren Badar

Ha-ha! Zeren Badar is back with a fresh round of sweet and sticky, slightly silly collages. Not much to add. They're just duChampion!

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All images © Zeren Badar
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"The British Abroad" is a document by photographer Peter Dench. All around Europe's coasts you'll find the British equivalent to America's Spring Break only year-round and probably involving more sausage, bacon and eggs. Bars make obscene offers to partiers, who cause shame to their home country as a result! To give you a glimpse of the mind behind the project, here's a quote from Mr. Dench "The first time I went abroad was in 1986; the destination was the party town of Magaluf, Majorca. Aged 14, already a seasoned beer drinker, my parents decided it was OK for me to have an alcoholic spirit in my drink; the alcoholic spirit I chose was the white rum, Bacardi. Bacardi was cheaper than coke (my mixer of choice) and the measures reflected that. The bars delivered a buy one, get two free offer and my mum, dad and older sister (by three years) Jennifer, clattered 12 glasses onto our uneven metal table outside the Benny Hill party pub, not far from the Green Parrot Bollocks bar. We slowly sucked back the potent sugary blend through bendy straws and watched the mayhem gather." (Magaluf itself recently announced it has passed laws to curb drinking on its streets.)

Peter has launched a fundraiser, asking only for £6000 and as of writing he's almost there. His previous books are "A & E: Alcohol & England," and "England Uncensored," so you get his drift. It's only £20 to get a signed copy for your donation - less than most similar campaigns. Should be horrifying and fun! Get funding.

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All images © Peter Dench/Getty Images Reportage

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Starting early.
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© Patrick Fraser

Long Biên Bridge is a cantilever bridge across the Red River that connects two districts of Hanoi, Vietnam. Now-regular contributor Patrick Fraser found time in his busy busy schedule to visit. The bridge was heavily bombed during the Vietnam War, and about half retains its original shape. Poor families live in boats under the bridge. (wikipedia)

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All images © Patrick Fraser

Check out Patrick's previous posts, Salad Days and Parada.
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East Belfast © John Irvine

It's been a while since I promoted a crowd-fund, but it's a new year and this is a project I can really get behind. John Irvine, born in Northern Ireland but living now in Scotland, wants to record the many miles of "peace walls" that were built during The Troubles with a view to separate Catholic from Protestant neighbour. I'd never even heard of this but I'm not surprised; they still exist and some Northern Irish think they should remain

John started shooting last year but is looking for a few quid from sponsors so he can go back and make this project into a proper record. You can help here via Indiegogo.

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Part of a peace divide that continues onto an external wall of a police station in West Belfast

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The peace wall that divides Alexandra Park in North Belfast

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West Belfast
All images © John Irvine
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© Justin Borucki

Prolific portrait and music photographer Justin Borucki adopted the old wet plate collodion process to record changing New York. With his necessary mobile darkroom, Borucki has embraced this tricky* process to make magical images of the city he loves. We've been colleagues over many years since he signed up for representation at the photo agency - props always to Kellie McLaughlin, now of Aperture. It's a pleasure to see how photographers progress and change with the times, coming into their own. 

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

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© Chris Polinsky

*Wikipedia: "Collodion process" is usually taken to be synonymous with the "collodion wet plate process", a very inconvenient form which required the photographic material to be coated, sensitized, exposed and developed within the span of about fifteen minutes, necessitating a portable darkroom for use in the field. 

Here's a video that American Photo made of Borucki doing his thing. 


See more over at Borucki's Tumblr.

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© Coco Martin

Once upon a time I fell in love with a series of photographs by Doris Mitsch of the poisonous and glorious datura flower. I was perturbed and fascinated when I learned that the images were made using only the light from her scanner. Fast forward a decade and find Coco Martin using his scanner to fully expose his models, holding it close to them, painting them with the light from it, and recomposing the images in post, to marvelous effect in a series of unusual portraits. Martin shares his time between Lima, Peru, and New York, and has been widely exhibited

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"This particular body of work represents the last five years of my practice in photography. I've been questioning myself about the concept of what we call a photograph and the meaning of the mechanical act of capture itself. I am looking to provide to my photographic work a new conceptual approach, and through scannographies, as a temporal denial and refusal to use a regular photographic camera, I am still able to call myself a photographer."

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"By only using a flatbed scanner on the skin's model - no external lighting, nor lens or aperture to control - I ended up discovering this 'magic kingdom of a candle light'. This is a statement of pause, a way to take some distance of the overwhelming reality and get the chance to think about the main source, the light and the subject, the eager attitude to really get someone soul almost from the very skin. 

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"Within the current context of massive production of images due to the arrival of the digital era and despite the fact that each piece might take days to be composed and completed, the process took me back to rediscover the meaning of patience instead of the present immediacy."

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All images © Coco Martin
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© Giles Clarke

A small round-up of portraits that Giles Clarke made in 2014. Giles is a social documentary photographer based in New York City who is known for his work, among multitudinous other topics and places, in Haiti, Bhopal, and with the Occupy movement. Just lately he has been producing for UNHCR, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, as well as being a Featured Contributor to Getty Images Reportage. 

These portraits will take you on but a portion of Giles' journey through last year.


I encourage you to take a look through Giles' website to see more.

Giles produces video, too. Here's a short film about Dr. Chiu, a volunteer doctor in Guatemala:


And an excellent interview with the photographer about his images of El Salvador's gang prisons. 

His feature on the Angola Prison Rodeo, a 45-year-old tradition at Louisiana State Penitentiary, was published in aCurator in late 2013.
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© Nat Wilkins

British photographer Nat Wilkins is working towards a BA in the UK and has a few interesting projects under his belt. I'm afraid I erm, chickened out of his original submission: "The images are a small edit from the essay of the Torajan tribe, these rites involve ritual animal slaughter, illegal cock fighting, gambling, elaborate processions and huge feasts." I couldn't stomach it. But I love this series about the making of beedies, Indian rollies I sometimes smoked when I was a teenager. They make your lips tingle. Nat gives us a glimpse into how they are made.

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All images © Nat Wilkins
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© Daniel Mirer

Multi-talented photographer Daniel Mirer is based in the USA and the Netherlands. His commercial work is in the tricky field of architecture and his personal work drills down into areas of interest such as masculinity, and Americana. 

Historically, a "thing" was "the governing assembly of a Germanic society, made up of the free people of the community presided over by lawspeakers."

Daniel tells me 'Thingstätten' is "a term used to define open-air Nazi cult theaters built between 1933-1945 for the specific intention to entertain local communities."

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About the locations in Daniel's series: "The productions performed were to project propaganda of an idealistic Germanic history and used as a recruitment tool for the National Socialist Party. Architecture and impressive scenic places were chosen as thingsteads: locations where based on Germanic idyllic surroundings in wooded areas, near bodies of waters, nestled in hills or by natural rock formation as well traces of archaeological ruins of local Germanic tribal history."

Daniel has received funding from the German government to help make this project happen, which helps me encourage other photographers to explore all possible options.

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All images © Daniel Mirer
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