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Another accomplished youngster. I'd seen one of Argentinian photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg's images illustrating a fiction piece in the New Yorker earlier this year. More recently, when I saw he was part of the Brighton Photo Festival, I visited his website and was just as thrilled by his work as I was the first time I saw it. I am particularly drawn to this series, 'Borders'; as Alejandro puts it, he is working with photography "in the border of the reality. Creating fictional scenarios with real people and situations." Chaskielberg shot on 6x6 positive film with a Rolleiflex.

Other projects include a unique series on the Argentine financial crisis in 2001, and more recently his ongoing project 'The High Tide: Native Islanders and the Community of the Paraná River Delta' which documents the Guaraní culture, and for which he received the 2009 Burn Emerging Photographer Grant. Chaskielberg was included in PDN's 30, 2009, 'Our Choice of New and Emerging Photographers to Watch'. And speaking of watching, here's Chaskielberg being interviewed in Brighton.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

© Alejandro Chaskielberg

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John announced a "merciless edit" of his blog. Upon visiting, I fell for this photo. Ahh, New York City.

© John Marshall Mantel


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Based in Helsingborg, Sweden, Martin Brink has an eye for the quiet, everyday moment, with work in simplistic categories such as 'Objects' and 'Mailboxes'. Here's just a small sample of what's available on his website. Martin's series 'The Daily Round' is also a book - check it out here.

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All images © Martin Brink

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aCurator is proud to present images from the digital exhibition '100 Portraits - 100 Photographers: Selections from the FlakPhoto.com Archive'.

November 6-13th is Fotoweek DC, and as part of the event, the city of Washington will be transformed into a nighttime gallery. The festival has traditionally leaned toward photojournalism but is introducing an art photo component with the 100 Portraits projection this year. Andy Adams, editor and publisher of FlakPhoto.com and Larissa Leclair, photography writer and curator, are presenting an exhibition drawn from the digital archive that has developed over four years of daily updates on Flak Photo. In the new tradition of online curation and celebrating the burgeoning online photo community that Flak represents, the two made their selections together in a series of Skype video chats.

"As an added fine art component to the NightGallery projections, this screening features 100 dynamic portraits from an exciting group of contemporary photographers in all stages of their careers, each selected from the digital archive on FlakPhoto.com. Our decision to highlight work from this website celebrates the role that a thriving online photography community plays in the discovery and dissemination of work produced by significant artists in the Internet Era. Contemporary photo culture is marked by a continuous flow of images online, and our aim is to take a moment to recognize some of the noteworthy photographs published in this ever-expanding archive over the past four years. In this context, projected several times larger than life, these portraits look back at us and embody a louder voice in the discourse of the gaze." - Andy Adams + Larissa Leclair


To learn more about the contributing artists and to see all 100 portraits, view the full online exhibition.

100 Portraits -- 100 Photographers: Selections from the FlakPhoto.com Archive from FlakPhoto.com on Vimeo.


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Opening November 11th at Carrie Haddad Photographs, Hudson, NY is 'Ordinary Things. When artists make their private life public. What is it like living with a photographer?'

Featured is the work of specially talented Thatcher Keats whose first show with Haddad was 10 years ago. This is a great opportunity to buy a limited edition silver print by Thatcher at a great price; he is a collectible artist, is widely exhibited and also lectures on photography.

Go get one.

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© Thatcher Keats

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Every week, I volunteer for a New York-based charity, and I've met some lovely and fascinating people. Most of my colleagues seem to have an artistic bent and today I saw this fabulous photograph by one of the people I'm sometimes lucky to work with, young Felipe Vasquez. It was fun to work with Lark for a short period; now she's off at a different location so I miss her and I'm happy to see her here, looking fierce.  

Lark and Billy © Felipe Vasquez

Steve_Pyke_Philosophers.jpgSteve Pyke's project 'Philosophers' has reached across two decades. Steve has an essay in the New York Times about how this project grew exponentially, and a gallery of images that feature quotes by the subject made during the photo session.

"I have spent almost a quarter century photographing philosophers. For the most part, philosophers exist, and have always existed, outside the public spotlight. Yet when we reflect upon those eras of humankind that burn especially bright, it is largely the philosophers that we remember. Despite being unknown at a time, the philosophers of an era survive longer in collective memory than wealthy nobleman and politicians, or the popular figures of stage, song and stadium. Because of this disconnect between living fame and later recognition, we have less of a record of these thinkers than we should. Our museums are filled with busts and paintings of long-forgotten wealth and beauty instead of the philosophers who have so influenced contemporary politics and society. My aim in this project has been the modest one of making sure that, for this era at least, there is some record of the philosophers."

Professor Peter Strawson, Oxford, 21 May 1990, © Steve Pyke
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ClampArt is very pleased to present an exhibition of work by artist Lori Nix, her first solo show at the gallery.

Since the mid-1990s, Lori Nix has been building tiny dioramas in her studio in Brooklyn which she then photographs with a large-format 8 x 10-inch camera. The monumental prints that are produced showcase the wondrous and obsessive care that goes into every minute detail of Nix's breathtakingly convincing miniatures.

For her newest body of work, "The City" (2005-2010), Nix has been constructing indoor, post-apocalyptic, urban scenes imagining what the city may look like when all the humans are dead and gone.  As critic, Sidney Lawrence, wrote in 'Art in America':  "The implications of Nix's tableaux never seem to stop.  Oddly endearing, terrifying and often electrifyingly plausible, they prod us to ponder the fact that, like it or not, our fate is uncertain."

Due to the great pains the artist takes in attending to every last feature of her constructions, some of the artworks, such as her new masterpiece, "Map Room," require up to six months to realize. Thus, Nix's scenes are highly planned in advance, and her output notably small.  ClampArt has been patiently waiting three years for the artist to produce enough work to mount a solo exhibition.

Lori Nix has received several photography awards. She is a 2004 New York Foundation for the Arts Individual Artist Grant recipient.  In 2001 she was awarded a residency at Light Work (an internationally recognized photography organization in Syracuse, New York). Nix was a 1999 recipient of an Ohio Arts Council Individual Artist Grant; a 1998 recipient of a Greater Columbus Ohio Arts Grant; and she participated in the Artist in the Market-place program at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in 2000.  Museum exhibitions include 'Fresh! Contemporary Takes on Nature and Allegory' at the Museum of Glass, Tacoma, Washington; 'Picturing Eden' and "Vital Signs" at the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York; Katonah Museum of Art's 'I Love the Burbs' in Katonah, New York; and 'Innocence' at the New Britain Museum of Art, New Britain, Connecticut; to name just a few. Her work is represented in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; and the El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, Texas; among many others. - Brian Clamp, Director.

The City opens at ClampArt, NYC, on November 4th and runs through December 18th, 2010.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Control Room, 2010 © Lori Nix

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aCurator is proud to support Aperture Foundation.

Paul Strand (born 1890, New York; died 1976, Orgeval, France) was one of the great photographers of the twentieth century. As a youth, he studied under Lewis Hine at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School, going on to draw acclaim from such illustrious sources as Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen. After World War II, Strand traveled around the world - from New England to Ghana, France to the Outer Hebrides - to photograph, and in the process created a dynamic and significant body of work. During the 1970s, major exhibitions of his work were displayed internationally, cementing his reputation as one of the greatest American photographers.

'Paul Strand in Mexico' is an exhibition of over a hundred photographic works including vintage prints and previously unseen documents and ephemera related to Strand's time in Mexico and is accompanied by a printed volume that documents the complete photographic works made by Strand during his 1932-34 trip to Mexico as well as a second journey in 1966 -- a total of 234 photographs, 123 of which have never before been published.

The exhibition is at Aperture through November 13th but you can see Strand's 'The Mexican Portfolio', presented by Aperture, at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, through January 2, 2011.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Woman and child, Hidalgo, 1933, courtesy and copyright
Aperture/The Paul Strand Archive

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Monday, November 1, 2010
The Lighthouse, Chelsea Piers

Bids may be placed online for all auction lots starting Monday, October 18, 12:00 noon EST, and ending Monday, November 1, 12:00 noon EST. Absentee bids may be placed via fax at (212) 979-7759, or using the absentee bid form available online until Monday, November 1, 12:00 noon EST. Bids will be entered on behalf of absentee bidders at the event, up to the maximum amount specified on their forms. The highest bids at the close of the live and silent auctions are the winning bids. All proceeds benefit Aperture Foundation.

Image ©
Hank Willis Thomas

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