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Stephen Mallon's latest exhibition officially opens tomorrow, Friday September 10th. The prints from his series on recycling of subway cars in the States look stunning at Front Room Gallery, a lovely space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Steve's so cool, he even had the MTA at the press review last night.

UPDATE: Listen to Steve talk about the project on NPR

View the photo feature in aCurator Magazine.

© Stephen Mallon

Aperture_200.jpgCelebrating the 200th edition of Aperture Magazine this month, with two covers available, Cindy Sherman or Clare Strand. It's a brilliant issue featuring Strand's 'The Spot Marks the X', Martin Parr's 'Oscar and his Taxi and 'Five Years After Katrina' with photographs by Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick. Buy it, or better yet, go ahead and subscribe now and get a free book.

© Clare Strand from the series 'The Betterment Room - Devices for Measuring Achievement, 2004-5' courtesy of Aperture
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Voices of Senegal is a new body of work which will be exhibited at 92YTribeca, NY. Opening on September 11th, talented young photographer Abby Ross will be showing her wonderful large prints and closing the evening with Senegalese musicians. 

Ekberg-A.jpgUPDATE AUGUST 2010: The film has been nominated for two Gemini Awards. Congratulations to Ian McLaren of Productions Grand Nord in Canada.
Watch the trailer.


Thanks to Rob Haggart and Brian Clamp for sending information about the screening of the documentary "Karsh is History" at Foto Week DC on November 10th 2009. Productions Grand Nord, in association with The Portrait Gallery of Canada and BRAVO! present this 52 minute film about the life and talent of Mr Karsh which debuted at the Festival International Du Film Sur L'Art in Montréal in March. I'm in it, but Annie Liebovitz has a bit more camera-time.

Of Anita Ekberg, Karsh said "Her natural behavior resembled the love goddesses she portrayed - uninhibited and seductive, and totally without guile."

Anita Ekberg, 1956 © Yousuf Karsh



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From the new book by Aperture Foundation.

"On the fifth anniversary of the storm, 'Destroy This Memory', photographs by Richard Misrach, offers unique, revealing human perspectives on the devastation and shock left in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. 'Destroy This Memory' presents previously unpublished and starkly compelling material, all of which Misrach shot with his 4 MP pocket camera. Created between October and December 2005, this haunting series of images serves as a potent, unalloyed document of the raw experiences of those left to fend for themselves in the aftermath of Katrina."

Artist's royalties for this project are being donated to the Make It Right Foundation, which is currently rebuilding the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans.

The images truly speak for themselves, containing the only text in this heart-breaking series.

View the magazine full screen photo feature.

Buy the book.

Exhibitions: Museum of Fine Arts Houston, August 7 - October 31, 2010
New Orleans Museum of Art, August 28 - October 24, 2010
Artist's Lecture and Book Signing
August 29, 2:00 pm

© Richard Misrach

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Sometimes an ex-pat finds herself in the company of a whole new set of people, uncovering shared experiences. Jason Florio and Helen Jones trumped all last night at their dinner table where I chatted with an Englishman who, it turns out, went to the same school as me, same gigs, same clubs, same Nick Cave book signing... Omar Mullick is not only from my original 'hood, he's also a great photographer and a videographer too, just back from filming in Pakistan. 

© Omar Mullick from the series 'Can't Take It With You'

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Myriam Babin sent out a newsletter today about her trip to London: cream teas at Fortnum and Mason, boiled eggs with soldiers... and now I'm feeling homesick. Someone get me a slice of Victoria sponge!


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aCurator is proud to support Aperture Foundation.

"Following the success of 2005's groundbreaking book and exhibition 'reGeneration: 50 photographers of tomorrow', 'reGeneration²: tomorrow's photographers today' turns the spotlight yet again on the next generation of potential stars. reGeneration² proves that the art of photography is alive and well, and that practitioners of extraordinary talent are well on their way to making their mark. The selection was made with one key question in mind: is the photographer likely to be known in twenty years' time?

Through over two hundred images, reGeneration² showcases the inspiring creativity and ingenuity of eighty up-and-coming photographic artists. The variety of subjects and techniques on view in this remarkable reflects the astonishing diversity of worldwide tal­ent that has newly emerged. Useful reference materials include biographical details of each of the eighty photographers included and updates on the winning photographers from the first edition, many of whom have since forged impressive international careers, including Pieter Hugo, Idris Khan, Angela Strassheim, and Nathalie Czech."

View the magazine full screen photo feature.

The Cloud, 2008 © Liu Xiaofang from the Aperture book entitled reGeneration²

Florio_Jason_Makasutu.jpgI'm not sure how Jason found time to put together a photography book, in between walking the Gambia with a large format camera and going on a 50,000 mile round-the-world assignment, but... he has and "Makasutu - Mecca in the Forest" looks fabulous.

Read about the project.

Buy the book.





Ismaila Denba, Gambian boat captain



Karsh_Churchill.jpgIt is 70 years ago today that Winston Churchill made his famous pronouncement in the House of Commons: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

Of his famous session with the PM, Karsh said "My portrait of Winston Churchill changed my life. I knew after I had taken it that it was an important picture, but I could hardly have dreamed that it would become one of the most widely reproduced images in the history of photography. In 1941, Churchill visited first Washington and then Ottawa. The Prime Minister, Mackenzie King, invited me to be present. After the electrifying speech, I waited in the Speaker's Chamber where, the evening before, I had set up my lights and camera. The Prime Minister, arm-in-arm with Churchill and followed by his entourage, started to lead him into the room. I switched on my floodlights; a surprised Churchill growled, "What's this, what's this?" No one had the courage to explain. I timorously stepped forward and said, "Sir, I hope I will be fortunate enough to make a portrait worthy of this historic occasion." He glanced at me and demanded, "Why was I not told?" When his entourage began to laugh, this hardly helped matters for me. Churchill lit a fresh cigar, puffed at it with a mischievous air, and then magnanimously relented. "You may take one." Churchill's cigar was ever present. I held out an ashtray, but he would not dispose of it. I went back to my camera and made sure that everything was all right technically. I waited; he continued to chomp vigorously at his cigar. I waited. Then I stepped toward him and, without premeditation, but ever so respectfully, I said, "Forgive me, sir," and plucked the cigar out of his mouth. By the time I got back to my camera, he looked so belligerent he could have devoured me. It was at that instant that I took the photograph."

Watch a reenactment of the making of the photograph on the Karsh website.

Winston Churchill, 1941 © Yousuf Karsh

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