Just got this news from Robert Altman - he has an exhibition of over 100 photos from 1966-1975 at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts on until January 3rd 2010. Robert has had a busy year, not least of all with his installation of Woodstock photos featured throughout the window display of Macy's NYC (a whole city block!) and the publication of his book 'The Sixties'.

'Celebrate', Holy Man Jam, Boulder CO, 1970 ©  Robert Altman


Buzz Aldrin has been in the news of late, releasing a children's book and memoir, and of course it was the 40th anniversary of the moon landing this year. Karsh photographed the astronauts Michael Collins, Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin and Neil Armstrong in 1969.

Apollo 11 astronauts © Yousuf Karsh


Profoto has an interview with the talented photographer and video artist Jonathan Saunders. JS and I have recently bonded over Bernie Madoff portraits, Michael Jackson's underpants, and swearing.

Image from 'Ohio' © Jonathan Saunders


I first met Adam Sherwin at a portfolio review a year or so ago. I challenge anyone in his company to not get caught up in his enthusiasm. Adam is not only a great young photographer, he's also proactive in his local photo scene.

Images from the series he made in Nairobi were exhibited last year at Drive In Studios, with proceeds from print sales going to benefit the Kids For Tomorrow Foundation, in keeping with Adam's general demeanour.



All images © Adam Sherwin

QE-II.jpgSomeone sent me an email showing pictures of Queen Elizabeth with 11 US presidents. Here she is in 1951, a year before ascending the throne. Karsh photographed all those presidents except Bush and Obama (the archive has photos of Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, James Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton).

Queen Elizabeth II, 1951 © Yousuf Karsh

Karsh_Taussig_Helen.jpgI have a treasured role representing the Karsh estate for licensing. Every day I get to look at his incredible archive and grant rights to publish his work. Today I'm looking at Dr. Helen Taussig, who basically founded pediatric cardiology and, alongside Dr Alfred Blalock at Johns Hopkins Hospital, came up with a cure for 'blue baby syndrome'. One of the colleges at Johns Hopkins in the School of Medicine has been named in her honor and the students would like to hang a copy in their college room so we gave permission and sent a TIFF file. I too love this warm portrait of Dr Taussig. Our portrait of Dr Blalock features the good man smoking a cigarette. Those were the days!

Dr. Helen Taussig, 1975 © Yousuf Karsh


New York's International Centre of Photography celebrates its third Triennial of Photography and Video with an opening soirée for members on October 1st. The Triennial will mark the closing cycle of ICP's 2009 Year of Fashion. "These artists variously explore fashion--whether in everyday dress, haute couture, street fashion, or uniforms--as a celebration of individuality, personal identity, and self-expression, and as cultural, religious, social, and political statements." One of my personal faves, Hank Willis Thomas, will be among the great on show.

Weller_Townsend.jpgFollowing the Gibson exhibition at Blender Gallery is Janette Beckman's "Stylin' and Profilin'" launching October 8th 2009. Janette is making the long haul from New York City to downtown Sydney and anyone who can should get down there. The show features around 50 of Janette's iconic shots of street culture, hip hop, punk and, well, lots more. Visit Janette's music site for a real treat.

Paul Weller and Pete Townshend, 1980 © Janette Beckman

lost-boys.jpgThe Lost Boys Foundation of Nashville, benefiting the Lost Boys of Sudan, presents a very rare event featuring historic works by internationally renowned music photographers Baron Wolman, Henry Diltz, Danny Clinch, and Jim McGuire. Each of the four photographers are donating 10 to 12 of their works to benefit the Lost Boys Foundation.

New to the Nikon USA website is their thoroughly enjoyable interview with Baron Wolman. Baron met Jann Wenner in 1967 and became Rolling Stone's first contributing photographer. There's a gallery of 17 images, including classic Jimi Hendrix and Jerry Garcia, as well as a couple of his stunning aerial photos. 

This shot of Joplin would appear to be a live gig, and was actually taken in Baron's studio during what he came to refer to as his 'concert for one'. "And that's the way it was in the late '60s in San Francisco. You needed photos of Janis Joplin, you called her up and she came over." Read more!

Janis Joplin © Baron Wolman

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