Exhibitions


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In order to view the "New Bears" at ClampArt, one has to walk through the main gallery space which is currently showing Luke Smalley's "Sunday Drive", a haunting story of three girls readying to visit their men in prison. Viewing Smalley's work on ClampArt's website I was more drawn to the "Exercise at Home" series. If only Smalley had used new bears instead of twinks...

Luke Smalley, "Exercise at Home," 2007, Digital C-print, Courtesy of ClampArt, New York City

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I missed the opening at Amador Gallery for Olaf Otto Becker because I was a meeting of the American Photo Archives Group, a trade organization with a great set of members; we meet to discuss the challenges of having a physical archive of photographs, negs, transparencies, contact prints and so on. But, from the dusty boxes-under-beds to a different theme entirely - Becker's  "Above Zero" project.  Risking life, limb and large-format camera, Becker photographs the incredible disappearing landscape of Greenland. I haven't seen the show yet so I can't comment on the prints but if what's on the web is anything to go by it'll be breath-taking.

River 3, Position 5, 2007 © Olaf Otto Becker

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Nothing against Jim Marshall but how good it is to learn Andy Earl has a book of his Johnny Cash photos coming out and an exhibition with our mates at Snap Galleries in their new location in Central London, opening November 18th, 2009.

Johnny Cash, Telegraph © Andy Earl

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The British Library in London has opened 'Points of View: Capturing the 19th Century in Photographs'. There's blurb and an 'online exhibition' but the Library's website is only an almost for me; they're trying, there's a blog for comments and all, but as usual I'd like to see some photos. Big photos. I don't want to have to click an image 4 times before it's larger than a postage stamp nor use 'zoomify', a feature that lets you scroll so that the image disappears entirely from your screen. Really though, this is all just an excuse for me to publish the Fox Talbot from my personal collection.

The Boulevard, Paris, 1843 by William Henry Fox Talbot

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Opening and book signing at Morrison Hotel Gallery, October 22, 2009, SoHo NYC: the legendary Jim Marshall.

Johnny Cash, San Quentin Prison, 1969 © Jim Marshall

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October 15th, 2009 is the opening night of Abe's show at Nathalia Laue in Frankfurt should you find yourself in Germany - go for this show and stay for the Book Fair! As well as this exhibition, Abe is doing an awful lot of printing (the poor man spent August in the darkroom) and working on his book 'Penelope's Hungry Eyes: Portraits of the Master Photographers'.

Brooklyn Bridge infrared, 1984 © Abe Frajndlich


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Just got this news from Robert Altman - he has an exhibition of over 100 photos from 1966-1975 at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts on until January 3rd 2010. Robert has had a busy year, not least of all with his installation of Woodstock photos featured throughout the window display of Macy's NYC (a whole city block!) and the publication of his book 'The Sixties'.

'Celebrate', Holy Man Jam, Boulder CO, 1970 ©  Robert Altman

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New York's International Centre of Photography celebrates its third Triennial of Photography and Video with an opening soirée for members on October 1st. The Triennial will mark the closing cycle of ICP's 2009 Year of Fashion. "These artists variously explore fashion--whether in everyday dress, haute couture, street fashion, or uniforms--as a celebration of individuality, personal identity, and self-expression, and as cultural, religious, social, and political statements." One of my personal faves, Hank Willis Thomas, will be among the great on show.

Weller_Townsend.jpgFollowing the Gibson exhibition at Blender Gallery is Janette Beckman's "Stylin' and Profilin'" launching October 8th 2009. Janette is making the long haul from New York City to downtown Sydney and anyone who can should get down there. The show features around 50 of Janette's iconic shots of street culture, hip hop, punk and, well, lots more. Visit Janette's music site for a real treat.

Paul Weller and Pete Townshend, 1980 © Janette Beckman

lost-boys.jpgThe Lost Boys Foundation of Nashville, benefiting the Lost Boys of Sudan, presents a very rare event featuring historic works by internationally renowned music photographers Baron Wolman, Henry Diltz, Danny Clinch, and Jim McGuire. Each of the four photographers are donating 10 to 12 of their works to benefit the Lost Boys Foundation.

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