Magazine


Gudrun-Georges-Pine-Ridge-B2.jpg

Gudrun Georges spent five days at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota with a non-profit group named One Spirit. One Spirit is not church affiliated, and is the only outside organization approved by the Sioux tribal council. Pine Ridge is an Oglala Lakota Native American reservation.

"The portraits were mostly done when I drove around dropping off food boxes. Some of these people's addresses were impossible to find - there are no street names on the reservation. One big thing that happened when I was there was the closing of the White Clay liquor shops. The state of Nebraska refused to renew liquor licenses to the few stores right outside the reservation. They have a huge alcohol problem in Pine Ridge and even though alcohol is forbidden on the reservation, White Clay is a short drive or walk away. Most Indians were very happy about this decision. They fought these White Clay stores for years."

Pine Ridge is the site of several events that marked tragic milestones in the history between the Sioux of the area and the United States government. 




Trupal-Pandya_01_b.jpg

  © Trupal Pandya

 The Konyak are a Naga people, and are recognised among other Naga by their tattoos, which they have all over their face and hands; facial tattoos were earned for taking an enemy's head. Read more (Wikipedia).

Trupal Pandya was born and raised in India. He has a bachelor's degree in photography from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York which is where we met, during a portfolio review. Trupal impressed everyone, and I left having pinched a print from Trupal's box and vowing to stay in touch. Visit his website for more portraits including Aghori, or Holy Men, and Aryans of the Himalayas.


Klaus_Enrique_Donald_Trump_No2-b.jpg

 Working within his usual creative process, Klaus Enrique turned, along with his stomach, to producing a series of Trumps. I think we both needed to get these out of our systems.


Brighten up with Klaus' previous feature Homage to Arcimboldo.

Lost_Place_Kamil_Sleszynski_b.jpg

Polish photographer Kamil Sleszynski graced me with this story about a center for addiction therapy last year. "The Catholic Centre for Education and Addiction Therapy Metanoia exists since 2000. The facility helps young people addicted to drugs and alcohol.

"Located in the Knyszynska Forest in Poland, it occupies the former administration building Agroma - plants which in the past produced agricultural machinery, home appliances, and probably also weapons. Unfortunately the resort is in poor condition. If by the end of the year does not collect money for repairs, will be closed."

Since then, Kamil reports that money was raised and the center has been saved. Kamil worked hard promoting this story - perhaps it helped.


See Kamil's previous story, Input/Output, in the blog.

Loreal-Prystaj-b2.jpg
© Loreal Prystaj

Young Loreal Prystaj was one of the most enthusiastic students I met on a visit to a photography class in 2012. Fast forward to 2016, she thankfully kept in touch and I was thrilled to see this series she made during a month-long artists' residence in Finland last summer. She inserted herself into the beautiful landscape to reflect upon nature. Simply gorgeous.

"Often times, mirrors are used to emphasize the minute details, but rarely used to look at the big picture. What if nature looked at itself? What would it see? What would we be?"


Do not miss her bathtub series - she's made almost 100! 




Scott-Houston-Incarceration-Inc-B.jpg
Estrella Jail © Scott Houston

I am pleased and honored to share Scott Houston's insight into the overwhelming subject of the racist mass incarceration of Americans, Incarceration Inc.: Today's American Slavery. The project features male and female inmates of Estrella Jail in Phoenix, Arizona, shown inside the jail, and outside performing their chain gang duties, and is accompanied by Scott's impassioned writing.

"The United States now has the highest rate of incarceration in the world by far, with 2.2 million citizens in prisons or jail. This phenomenon has generally been driven by changes in laws, policing, and sentencing, not by changes in behavior. The results have disproportionately impacted poor and disenfranchised communities mostly people of color, and African American men. These historic changes remain nearly invisible to many Americans. 

"American slavery was technically abolished in 1865, but a loophole in the 13th Amendment has allowed it to continue as "punishment for crimes" well into the 21st century. Corporations have lobbied for a broader definition of "crime" in the last 150 years. As a result, there are more dark-skinned people performing mandatory, essentially unpaid, hard labor in America today than there were in 1830. The vast majority of prisoners have been locked up for non-violent, victimless crimes, many of them drug related. With such a large population incarcerated it comes as no surprise that big business began tapping into this potentially cost-free workforce.

"Incarceration is the new American slavery. This slavery is supported by laws and corporate interests."


"McDonalds, the world's most successful fast food franchise, purchases a plethora of goods manufactured in prisons, including plastic cutlery, containers, and uniforms. The inmates who sew McDonalds uniforms make even less money by the hour than the people who wear them. Wal-Mart's company policy clearly states that "forced or prison labor will not be tolerated by Wal-Mart" when basically every item in their store has been supplied by third party prison labor factories. Wal-Mart purchases its produce from prison farms, where laborers are often subjected to long hours in the blazing heat without adequate food or water. Other corporate businesses that profit from exploiting free prison labor are: Bank of America, K-Mart, Chevron, Exxon Mobil, Koch Industries, Microsoft, Pfizer, Pepsi, Shell, Starbucks, UPS, Verizon, Wendy's, and many, many more. 

"Incarceration Inc. Today's American Slavery" is a multi-media project that addresses mass incarceration in the United States. American prisons today are functioning as commercial enterprises, backed by corporations. The U.S. justice system is riddled with racial oppression. Private business are taking advantage of vulnerable, powerless, and disenfranchised prisoners who are mostly people of color, and African American men. The invisible exploitation of cost-free inmate labor is growing."

Sharon-Kain-B.jpg

Yes, these were made at the photographer's local aviary! Nicely done, Sharon Kain - proving once again that one need not stray too far from home to make interesting photos.

Happy new year, friends.


Jason-Wilde_VJ_b.jpg

"Vera & John" is a collection of photographs that Jason Wilde made from notes that his mum, Vera, left for his Dad, John. Without Vera's knowledge, John and Jason saved more than 90 notes between 2005 and 2014. Jason then set about making more than 4000 photos of paving stones on specific streets in Camden, north London, where they and five generations of Jason's family have lived, using those images as the background for his photographs of the notes. Simply brilliant, fascinating, and fun.

View the full screen magazine photo feature - These are but a few of the insights into the life of Vera & John. See more: Jason has launched a Kickstarter campaign to turn this into a book. Enjoy the video promo, and drop a bit of cash - the pound is so weak you can get a book for $26! Contribute here.


"The idea of making a project about my mum and dad came to me while visiting their home in 2005. With no one home I had a rummage through the fridge and food cupboards before making a nice cup of tea. Leaning against the wall next to the kettle was a note. I had been collecting notes since 2003 for a different project (called 'Silly Arse Broke It') and realised that this single note outlining that evenings dinner arrangements was a potential project."

See "Silly Arse" here in aCurator Magazine.

Ralf-Graebner-b.jpg

 "Change" is a series of photographs of American quarter-dollars that Ralf Graebner found on the streets of New York City, intrigued by "the metamorphosis of these quarters from looking identical when they were minted to looking distinctly unique after they had been exposed to various harsh environments over time." 

View the full screen magazine photo feature then come back and learn how he does it!

He creates these graphic depictions by combining thousands of thin image slices made with a macro lens to produce a "three-dimensionally stitched image." Hard to reckon so here's the full monty on his method:
"I am using a technique called "focus stacking" to overcome two limitations of conventional photography, namely, extremely limited depth of field in macro photography at open aperture, and loss of detail through diffraction when the aperture is stopped down.
In other words, in conventional single-shot macro photography you either have to accept shallow depth of field but good detail where in focus, or more depth of field but overall soft images due to the detail-robbing effects of diffraction when you close the aperture.
What I do instead is take pictures with extreme shallow depth of field (around 1/100 of a millimeter!) but with the highest image quality where the image is in focus, and between each exposure I move the camera in increments of 1/100mm towards the subject. In order to capture a subject that requires 1 millimeter of depth of field with this technique I need to make 100 exposures. These 100 shots are then analyzed by a software that determines what's in focus and what's not, and merges everything into one image with complete depth of field, discarding what's out of focus."
Phew! Not enough for you?
"I repeat this process 30-40 times, photographing small sections of the coin, until all of the subject is captured. These 30-40 focus-stacked images are then stitched together to become the final image. With this technique I capture so much detail that I could create 10' x 10' prints that are tack-sharp. The limitations are merely the maximum width of chromogenic paper available, as well as portability of the prints: more than 7 feet, and I would run into problems getting the prints through regular-sized door frames."
See some that did make it through the door, at Fuchs Projects, 56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206 during Bushwick Open Studios, September 30 to October 2, 2016. 

Did you know? A quarter costs 11 cents to produce. 

JA-Mortram-blog.jpg
© J A Mortram

 Through his ongoing commitment to Small Town Inertia, Jim Mortram is dedicated to showing what life is like for people living in the margins of society. Basing his experiences solely around the area in which he lives, we see how the system is failing his neighbours and by extension the disadvantaged across the UK.

"Witnessing Tilney1's battle with Paranoid Schizophrenia over the course of the past 12 months, his medication changes, his endurance in isolation, his fight to exist and to navigate existence with and often without the regular support and contact with professional care teams, has been both terrifying and illuminating."

"It was as though watching a man drowning beneath the ice. I see him hitching for breath, chest heaving, eyes wild, fingers whipping at the indifferent, almost invisible, wall above.
I can do nothing but witness." J A Mortram, 2016







Film about Jim by Neale James
"This short film documentary introduces one of photography's more altruistic photographers and the people for whom his pictures have made real life impact."

Recent Entries

Categories

Links