Magazine


GODLIS_Miami-b.jpg Miami Beach, 1974 © GODLIS

GODLIS is widely known for his photos of the punk scene in New York... the rest of his archive is also rich and fabulous. Let's sneak back in time with him to Miami Beach, 1974. 


"I took these photographs in late winter 1974, when I was in Miami Beach for 10 days visiting my (Jewish) grandmother who lived in the area now known as South Beach. I was on a short break from my first year of photography school up in Boston (East Cambridge, a school called Imageworks). By that time in 1974, I was already knee deep into "street photography",  and had already burned my way through various photography books: Henri Cartier-Bresson's Decisive Moment, Robert Frank's The Americans, as well as the work of Garry Winogrand and Lee Friedlander. 

"But it is Diane Arbus who echoes through all of these Miami Beach 1974 photographs. Diane Arbus died less than 3 years earlier, in the summer of 1971. And by fall of 1972 a tremendous exhibition of her life's work had opened at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. Quite unlike any photo exhibition before, there were long lines of people daily at the Museum to see her work. I took a trip (a pilgrimage) to New York to see that show, and got myself a copy of the now legendary Arbus Aperture Monograph. And a little over a year later I took these pictures in Miami Beach. This is no coincidence.

"At age 22, Miami Beach was somewhat familiar territory to me. I had been on many visits to Miami as a kid visiting my grandparents. So I was quite familiar with the mix of palms and  kitsch. There are photos of me in my Davy Crocket shirt under the palm trees. But now, instead of having my picture taken, I was doing the picture taking. Shooting over those 10 days with my Pentax Spotmatic and a wide angle lens, I was welcomed by the Jewish retirees playing cards - "why do need my picture?" "You're such a nice boy, you should meet my granddaughter". I spent every day wandering along Ocean Drive and accompanying Lummus Park lawns, nearby Washington Street, the Dog Tracks and the old Pier. I took trips to the Zoo, and explored the Lincoln Road Mall where I found the "golden girls" protesters demonstrating for Nixon's impeachment, less than two years after the 1972 Republican Convention had nominated him in Miami Beach itself. I went back to photography school with over 50 shot rolls of Tri-X, and realized I'd just turned a corner. 

"When taking these pictures, I remember following the advice of Garry Winogrand. Look through the lens carefully, and be very aware of what you include between the four edges of the photograph. Keep your eyes open and concentrate. I believe that it was during this 10 day break from photography school in Miami Beach in 1974 that I first found my "eye."" - GODLIS


Out now from Matte Editions: GODLIS: History is Made at Night


Kavin-Horan-Porcine-b.jpg
 Ginger © Kevin Horan

 Kevin Horan's last feature in the magazine was his gorgeous and hugely popular series of goats and sheep. I am happy to publish some more of his barnyard friends, this time it's the pigs. As an almost-lifelong vegetarian, I wonder how you could eat these guys, but as Kevin says, "Of all the animals we eat, they're the only ones who will return the compliment."

"Farm animals are products. They produce fiber or eggs or milk or horse power. Pigs are grown for only one thing: meat.

Having moved to a place where my neighbors are barnyard animals, I am compelled to see them as individuals. Through portraiture, I can regard them as non-human persons. I can attempt to bridge the species divide. I can try to see what's going on inside the pig mind. Anyone who spends time around these animals knows they have particular personalities. Can the camera let us see them? Or are we seeing the illusion that's in all portraits?


Pigs are uncanny - clearly a different order of beast from other farm animals. They're so like us that they're used in medical education, and their heart parts and lungs can be transplanted into humans. They share many diseases with us. They prefer a clean place to eat and sleep, unsoiled by feces and filth. They like to watch TV and drink beer, and given the opportunity, they grow fat and sedentary. Of all the animals we eat, they're the only ones who will return the compliment.

And they're clever. They can figure out gates and latches and switches, and human relationships. They're self-sufficient. They're on the job. They're watching, and they know how to get what they need."

"Dogs look up to you; cats look down on you," Winston Churchill observed. "Give me a pig - he looks you in the eye and treats you as an equal."
Thanks to Kevin for his writings. 

#GoVeg! 


1-Long-Goodbye-2017-44'x60'-Selenium-Toned-Gelatin-Silver-Print-b.jpg
 Long Goodbye, 2017 © Michael Massaia
44" x 60" Selenium-toned gelatin silver print

 Michael Massaia started photographing New York's last remaining pay phones in 2012. "It's in the Leaving" continues in a similar vein to Michael's previous portfolios, his nods to the recent past, its echoes, and to childhood; although one may perhaps feel less nostalgic towards this subject, not missing the days of sharing a mouthpiece with hundreds or thousands of strangers.

"While almost none of these phones still function, there is subtle proof of life inside each one. Their main function now is to seemingly act as totems pointing to less knowing, less connected, and, perhaps, better/less revealing times."

Available in real life as impeccable hand-made selenium-toned gelatin silver prints.



Massaia-Michael-massaia-2017-printing.jpg
The artisan at work

Barnes-Collection-Philadelphia-Ben-Marcin-b.jpg
 Barnes Collection, Philadelphia © Ben Marcin

 Ben Marcin photographs everyday structures such as walls, parking garages, office buildings, stairwells, sidewalks, and warehouses. Ben says he "is not interested in documenting these structures but in extracting certain elements from them to create photographs that describe shapes and forms, patterns, geometry and color." Most successfully! 

In this project, he traversed several museums, photographing everything but the art. "Marcin set out to create a work of art by using the basic infrastructure of a building that houses masterworks of arts. He spent hours inside each museum photographing the ceiling lights, hand rails, display cabinets, air conditioning ducts, auditorium seats - anything he could think of other than the actual art hanging on the walls. Occasionally this led to interesting conversations with the security guards. Later he built very complex grids using selected individual photographs, thus presenting a virtual deconstruction of each museum. All of the photographs in the composites are straight images."



Go see: Ben's solo exhibition at C. Grimaldis Gallery in Baltimore, now through December, 23, 2017 (in conjunction with another aCurator favorite, Tara Sellios).

Rob-hann-highway-90-tx-b.jpg
 © Rob Hann

 Rob Hann shares another of his perennial road trips, from earlier this year, this time covering Arizona, California, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Nevada. View the full screen magazine photo feature, and if you're in New York City, wander down Prince Street and see if Rob is there selling his lovely and affordable prints. Holidays are coming! 

Writes Rob: Music plays a big part in my road trips. I travel alone and the playlists I take with me set the mood when I'm out there. The strange and restless road songs on Joni Mitchell's 1976 album "Hejira" are always with me.

These lines from the song "Black Crow" seem to say something about what I'm doing when I'm on the road.

There's a crow flying
Black and ragged
Tree to tree
He's black as the highway that's leading me
Now he's diving down
To pick up on something shiny
I feel like that black crow
Flying
In a blue sky

Go on Rob Hann's previous road trips:
Lone Star State of Mind

Chloe-Juno-Cow-Parsley-b.jpg
 Yarrow © Chloe Juno 
 
Meet the wild flowers of Cornwall as seen by Chloe Juno on her summer walks. Chloe also curates and is mainly looking at documentary images, so this was a nice respite. Check out Chloe and others on Documenting Britain on Instagram


Brian-David-Stevens-Grenfell-Tower-b.jpg
 © Brian David Stevens

 "The faces look out at you from the street, posters for the missing and the dead are everywhere in the area. They were a constant when I was photographing. It was vital to record these before the posters faded and disappeared and the victims became just numbers and statistics. The faded images were important.

"I started to photograph Grenfell Tower the day after the fire. I took these pictures as a member of the public. I was in the same state of shock as everybody was as I walked around the block. I didn't want to use privileged viewpoints, I wanted the same view as everybody else. I used a camera with a fixed lens that gives a similar viewpoint to your eyes, you are seeing what I'm seeing and hopefully nothing is getting in the way of that vision.

"I photographed the area every day for a month after the disaster, circling the tower. You have to immerse yourself in the subject, but no matter how many times I went back, each time I saw the burnt out husk of Grenfell Tower it utterly floored me. It never became 'normalised', it was still utterly shocking. Every day I just walked round the site making pictures, but mainly just looking. The tube station (Latimer Road) is next to Grenfell Tower and still, weeks later, the tube goes quiet as it passes; the streets are quiet. There's a huge amount of anger there under the surface. The presence of the burnt out block casts a black shadow over the area. It's been described to me as a vast tomb in the sky. It must be incredibly difficult to get on with life seeing it there every day.

"I've seen the story being exploited by all sides of the debate, without much thought for the actual victims of the fire. It's a complex situation and it helps nobody to describe it in soundbites. The BBC has been doing a very good job there. People are angry though and people are in pain, this must be realised. I knew I had to try to make honest, respectful work, and I hope I have." - Brian David Stevens, August, 2017.


The series will exhibit as part of the Northern Eye Festival in Colwyn Bay, North Wales, from October 9th to 21st, 2017.


Gudrun-Georges-Pine-Ridge-B2.jpg

Gudrun Georges spent five days at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota with a non-profit group named One Spirit. One Spirit is not church affiliated, and is the only outside organization approved by the Sioux tribal council. Pine Ridge is an Oglala Lakota Native American reservation.

"The portraits were mostly done when I drove around dropping off food boxes. Some of these people's addresses were impossible to find - there are no street names on the reservation. One big thing that happened when I was there was the closing of the White Clay liquor shops. The state of Nebraska refused to renew liquor licenses to the few stores right outside the reservation. They have a huge alcohol problem in Pine Ridge and even though alcohol is forbidden on the reservation, White Clay is a short drive or walk away. Most Indians were very happy about this decision. They fought these White Clay stores for years."

Pine Ridge is the site of several events that marked tragic milestones in the history between the Sioux of the area and the United States government. 




Trupal-Pandya_01_b.jpg

  © Trupal Pandya

 The Konyak are a Naga people, and are recognised among other Naga by their tattoos, which they have all over their face and hands; facial tattoos were earned for taking an enemy's head. Read more (Wikipedia).

Trupal Pandya was born and raised in India. He has a bachelor's degree in photography from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York which is where we met, during a portfolio review. Trupal impressed everyone, and I left having pinched a print from Trupal's box and vowing to stay in touch. Visit his website for more portraits including Aghori, or Holy Men, and Aryans of the Himalayas.


Klaus_Enrique_Donald_Trump_No2-b.jpg

 Working within his usual creative process, Klaus Enrique turned, along with his stomach, to producing a series of Trumps. I think we both needed to get these out of our systems.


Brighten up with Klaus' previous feature Homage to Arcimboldo.

Recent Entries

Categories

Links