Magazine


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Woman Carrying Fish, by Jeremy Scott (USA). Grand Prix de la Découverte winner & 1st place in the People/Portraits category

The results of the first annual International Fine Art Photography competition were announced in November and the results were exhibited at NoFound during Paris Photo. The Grand Prix de la Découverte winners' prizes included a weekend in Paris for the opening of the exhibition during Paris Photo, and all 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners and the finalists had work accepted into the prestigious collection of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. As one of the jurors, in esteemed company, aCurator is pleased with the results and proud to publish the winners!


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Red Note, by Javier Arcenillas (Spain). Grand Prix de la Découverte winner & 1st place in the Street Photography/Documentary category

Below are some of my personal favourite runners-up.

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BBoy Attitude, by Alessandro Falco (Italy). Finalist in the Street Photography/Documentary category 

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Legs Are All You Need, by Lucia Eggenhoffer (Czech Republic). Finalist in the Street Photography/Documentary category 

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Devonian Drawer: Gastropod, by Art Murphy (USA). Finalist in the Still Life category

Grand_Prix-_Ana_Galán.jpgYvette in a Forest in Algeria, by Ana Galán (Spain). Finalist in the People/Portraits category

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Hillside Fence, Study 6. Teshikaga, Hokkaido, Japan, 2007 © Michael Kenna

I am thrilled to publish a selection of work from master photographer Michael Kenna, in conjunction with his retrospective at Chris Beetles Fine Photographs in London, showing from November 14th, 2012 to January 2nd, 2013. This is Kenna's first exhibition in London in seven years.

"I prefer suggestion over description. The world is pretty chaotic, seemingly always speeding up and getting louder and more visually dense. I am interested in finding and/or creating calm shelters from the storm, places where quiet and solitude is encouraged and inner contemplation possible. I think we could all use a break from time to time..." Michael Kenna, via Chris Beetles.

Michael was one of my fellow jurors for the Grand Prix de la Découverte recently and I was over-joyed to find this fellow British ex-pat (he lives in Seattle) warm, funny, and snappy

I was interested to see some of Kenna's commercial work. Take a look.

Michael is also showing 'Asian Landscapes' at Galerie Troncin-Denis in Nancy, France, from November 15th, 2012 to January 5th, 2013.


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© Michael Massaia

"Borrowed Time is an exploration into the moment the point of no return has been reached and subsequent freedom that follows. Using the visual of mid-flight plane failures was my attempt to show the moment that horror, relief, freedom, and graphic beauty all meet at once."

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

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© Neil Craver

Based in North Carolina, Neil Craver started out as an abstract painter and figurative sculptor. He is embracing photography to explore his philosophical theories.

"This project is meant to be consumed with your emotions, and not simply perceived with your sense organs. I wanted a transcendental meaning behind them, not only with the use of chromatics and aesthetics. I wanted a 'subliminal composition' to create an undertow of messages to stress the strong influences of unconscious elements affecting and driving people's lives."

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

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© Sean Hawkey

British-based Sean Hawkey is a "documentary photographer and communications consultant who has worked in 40 countries, focusing mainly on development, humanitarian and rights-based issues." aCurator is proud to publish some images from this series he made in Nicaragua.

"Where do all those Olympic gold medals come from? Almost certainly some of the gold comes from mines like these. The gold is mined by people risking their lives, sometimes losing their lives; risking their health, normally losing their health. The gold is processed using the most toxic of substances that find their way into the water that people and animals drink, the air that people breath, and into the soil. These images are just a small example of a vast human and environmental disaster worldwide related to the mining of gold and other precious metals. The miners themselves rarely get much out of it, they mainly manage to get by for a few years, not a bad option in some developing countries. The enormous mining corporations like B2Gold and Gold Corp strike incredibly favourable deals, that many say can only be got with corruption, where they pay perhaps 5% in royalties - this is the case with B2Gold in Nicaragua - so they get great profits for their shareholders; but it is filthy lucre, shameful profit, they leave behind poisoned environments that may never recover, and that doesn't help the people living there. Protestors against this state of affairs are routinely murdered across Latin America... Gives another meaning to winning gold." - Sean Hawkey.


Find Sean on Facebook.

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"Patron" Hillbilly Ranch, Boston, Massachusetts, 1972 © Henry Horenstein, courtesy of Horenstein and ClampArt


I am pleased to present a small selection of images from Henry Horenstein's 'Honky Tonk: Portraits of Country Music.' As you can see, I went with a selection of people on the periphery, but you can also see some big-name country music stars at ClampArt, NYC, where the exhibition is on now through October 13th, and online, in conjunction with Henry's latest book of the same title.

"Some say the 1970s were the last great decade of country music - between the pomade, plaid jackets, and goofy hillbilly jokes of the 1950s and the more polished 'Urban Cowboy' sound of Nashville in the early 1980s. Horenstein's work captures it all, from the roadside seediness of TJ's Lounge to the backstage glamour at the Grand Ole Opry. From bluegrass festivals and country music parks to the honky tonks and dance halls, these images picture such celebrities as Dolly Parton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Waylon Jennings, up to a recent cardboard cut-out of Garth Brooks (which speaks volumes about the artist's personal opinion of the direction the genre has taken of late). However, the photographs feature not only the stars, but also include the familiar venues and enthusiastic fans who sustain them."

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

Full disclosure: I am now working at ClampArt and thrilled to be in a position to work with artists such as Henry, and others who have been published here in the past, not least of all one of my favourites, Lori Nix.

Submissions to aCurator are still thoroughly encouraged!

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© UNICEF /  Betty Press

"When a child behaves like an adult he sees what an adult sees." African proverb

This series of photographs is from Betty Press' 20 year project which has culminated in a book 'I Am Because We Are: African Wisdom in Image and Proverb.'

"The title of the book comes from a well-known proverb, attributed to South Africa, 'I am because we are: we are because I am.' It speaks to the interconnectedness and responsibility that we have for each other, and it embodies the concept of Ubuntu, the African idea of living harmoniously in community. Together the images and proverbs tell the story of life, moving through: family, home, education, relationships, work, leisure, environment, conflict, peace, music, dance, religion, wisdom, old age, and death, finally coming full circle with hope, as life goes on with the descendants and the living community. The proverbs in this book have been compiled by Annetta Miller who has been collecting proverbs for more than 30 years. Ms. Miller, an American born in Tanzania, has worked in East Africa for most of her life."

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

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Groom, Texas © Rob Hann

Repeat contributor and good mate Rob Hann makes collaborating easy and fun. I share his Brit-ex-pat love for the American highway so I am pleased to once again chuck you in the passenger seat and take you away for a bit.

"For my latest road trip I wanted to travel around the edge of Texas so that's what I did. I flew into Houston and drove a rental car anti-clockwise all the way round, with a couple of trips into the interior, til I got back to Houston. Here are some of the pictures I took along the way." - Rob Hann, August 2012

Enjoy the rest of summer! (apologies for being Northern Hemisphere-centric)

View the magazine full-screen photo feature.

See Rob's previous features here and here.

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© Wayne Lawrence

Welcome to the Bronx Riviera.

I reviewed Wayne Lawrence's Urban Beach Week, Miami, series, and interviewed him last year for Emerging Photographer. What a pleasure to engage with a young photographer who came a little later to the art and who has embraced exactly what it is they love, with marvelous results. Over the years of representing the estate of Yousuf Karsh I have learned a lot about portraits; we benefit from the connection Wayne is able to make in such a short time.

"Orchard Beach, a mile-long sliver of constructed shoreline, has long served as an oasis for generations of working-class families living in an environment defined by struggle, yet is embedded in the imagination of many as a ghetto beach carrying all the stereotypes associated with the hood. As the only beach in the Bronx, the stigma attached to Orchard is due in part to the complex history of a borough stained by a tumultuous past and loaded with racial, cultural, and socio-economic undertones. With this series, I determined to create a body of work in celebration of this community at Orchard Beach and have sought to exalt the souls who have allowed me to share their space.

I began the journey to the heart of the Riviera at a crucial point in my personal life. I was a father and wounded, having witnessed the birth of my son a few years earlier, only to experience the most profound grief a year later when my older brother David was brutally murdered. Finding a sense of community at Orchard Beach has allowed me the time and space to reflect on the importance of family and to find my voice as a photographer.
I've approached this work instinctually and see every person portrayed here as magnificent in their own way. To stand face-to-face with the souls in these images is to accept them as they are without prejudice because ultimately, we are all one.

Bearing witness to the polarities of human existence is what drives me to do this work. I am interested in examining the totality of life with all its complexities from our entry into this world as raw potential to the day we no longer exist."

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

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Peshawar, Pakistan, 1988 © Marissa Roth

"One Person Crying: Women and War, is a 28-year, personal global photo essay that addresses the immediate and lingering effects of war on women. In an endeavor to reflect on war from what I consider to be an under-reported perspective, the project brought me face to face with hundreds of women who endured and survived war and its ancillary experiences of loss, pain and unimaginable hardship. I traveled the world photographing, interviewing and writing down their histories, noting gestures and gruesome details, in order to document how war irrevocably changed their lives. Women are the touchstones for families and communities and are often relied upon to keep everything held together during a war or conflict. Often, there is no time for them to assess their own traumas afterwards, let alone speak of them in order to process the experience. I was compelled to put faces and give voices to the other side of war, with no judgment as to which war was worse for its victims. There is no blood or any guns in the images, just the record of lives lived with a never-ending post-war backdrop."

Marissa has launched a Kickstarter Campaign to help with the expense of producing a traveling exhibition of the work. Funding starts at $1 - rewards start at only $25 - lend a hand?

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

"The consequences of war for women in countries, cultures and communities that are directly affected by it, have often been overlooked. My main hope for this project is to show that war doesn't discriminate how it metes out pain or suffering, that women are basically the same everywhere in how they endure war and live with its aftermath into their post-war lives. I also hope that this project inspires dialog and activism, in order to bring on-the-ground psychological and social support to these war-impacted women.

Addressing this subject started in response to immediate political and social events that I covered as a photojournalist starting in the late 1980's. After 10 years, I formalized it into a documentary project and continued it from that perspective. In 2009, it was during a trip to Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, that I fully understood the deeper motivation for this work. My parents were Holocaust refugees and my paternal grandparents, and great-grandmother were killed in a 1942 massacre in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. On the final day of that trip, I found my grandparents' former home, and also found their names on a memorial plaque by the Danube River, dedicated to the numerous massacre victims. It felt like I had found them for the first time.

In March/April of 2012, I went to Vietnam for the first time, in order to finally conclude the arc of the project. The war in Vietnam was my coming-of-age war and greatly influenced my formative years, not only as a person and activist, but also as a photographer."

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