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Towards the end of 2011 I reviewed the portfolio of a photographer* who suggested I might like the work and personality of a young woman who had assisted him, and I was happy to be formally introduced to Jennifer Osborne. I had heard Jen speak about her work in the summer of 2010 at Aperture as part of the program around the publication of the book 'reGeneration: tomorrow's photographers today'; I was moved by her series 'Tough Blood' about the mentally ill, suicide-prone residents of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. However, I chose this project, Net Generation, which she photographed in July 2009, to kick off the new year.

It has been suggested that in China more than 10% of the country's 100 million teenage web surfers fall prey to excessive gaming and online activity. Jennifer Osborne visited Doctor Tao Ran's recovery program for Internet addicts, established in 2004. The young people Jen photographed are in summer video game rehab at the Beijing Region Military Hospital.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

The series was originally produced with the support of COLORS Magazine.

*Carlo Hindian

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Ruth Bernhard, San Francisco, 1988 © Abe Frajndlich

Abe Frajndlich gave me free reign to put together a second series from his stunning new book, 'Penelope's Hungry Eyes' which is packed with over 100 portraits of the master photographers. If your favourites are not here in my edit I'm sure you'll find them in the book.

"With a single-mindedness and tenacity which can only be compared to Penelope's faith in the return of her husband Odysseus, Abe's "hungry eyes" pursued the goal of photographing photographers for generations. In the course of over thirty years he compiled an ever-growing portrait collection of famous colleagues, 101 of which now appear in his new book."

On December 7th, 2011, the New York Public Library will be host to a discussion between Frajndlich; Henry Adams, author of the introductory text; and Duane Michals, one of the  photographers featured in the book.

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Police Athletic League Boxing

The fortunate folk at VandM have partnered with the Museum of the City of New York on exclusive, editioned prints selected from Stanley Kubrick's wonderful negatives archive. Shooting for Look Magazine from 1945 - 1950, when he left to pursue film-making, Kubrick produced a bunch of stellar stills.

Available to the public for the first time, at $250 for an 11x14, you might be able to treat yourself. 

The majority of the proceeds go to the Museum.

All photographs by Stanley Kubrick, courtesy of VandM, where you'll find lots more info.


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Born in Germany and based in Stockholm, photographer Ole Elfenkämper has produced a couple of documentary series in Albania recently: one covers environmental concerns, and the other, which I'm happy we could put together into a feature here, is about a strike by chrome miners that lasted three months and is the longest industrial action since the fall of communism.

Bulqiza is a town in eastern Albania and is one of the richest areas in chrome in the Balkans. On July 4th its chrome miners downed their tools to protest for better working conditions, a wage increase, and changes to the administration of the mine for the sake of its future.

The miners started their protest in Bulqiza but after 16 days of general strikes and protests they went to the capital, Tirana, where they camped in a park nearby and went each day for five days to protest in front of Prime Minister Sali Berisha's office. With no hearings by the government forthcoming they decided to return to Bulqiza, and a group of 15 miners went 1400 meters underground to begin a hunger strike.

On October 8th, after three months of strike and long negotiations, the miners went back to work having agreed a deal with the management which included a wage increase. Just twelve days later, 1600m underground a massive explosion took place and one miner died and two out of seven wounded were fighting for their lives.

After the incident, the Union for Inspection and Rescue of Mines closed the mine until the company fulfills the security requirements for the 'galleries.' With the mine closed and the owners having not paid the workers during the months of the strike, the lives of the miners have become more and more difficult. They are forced to risk their lives working in other, sometimes abandoned, mines. As a result of working in unsafe conditions another deadly accident took place on November 11th in the chrome mining area in Bulqiza, bringing the total to 15 deaths in the last three years. Prosecutors are still investigating.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

© Ole Elfenkämper

Thanks to Ole for the photographs and text for this feature

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Here's another young, raw photographer whose work and attitude I find exciting: Harry Gould Harvey VI is a self-taught 19 year-old high school dropout based in Newport, Rhode Island. We've been emailing for a few months, talking about punk music, wealth disparity, Occupy Wall Street and discontent in general. In between first contact and the publication of this feature, HGH has been on the road with his own hardcore band, Convulsions. I really appreciate the value that this young artist put on connecting with me, saying how hard it is to otherwise access "the world of contemporary photography." This is part of an ongoing series, a sarcastic, social commentary that is meant to be alarming and disconcerting, to convey a sense of anger, and is shot in and around the mansions of Newport.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

© Harry Gould Harvey VI

Also worth a look: HGHIV and his partner run The Amerikants, a project that "has been created to showcase the artwork of people who are involved in the hardcore/punk/metal scenes around the world. The ideas and art that will create this site are all based around the DIY ideal, and it is an opportunity to expose work with peers having similar interests."



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© Leslie Jean-Bart

Another interesting find at a portfolio review, Leslie Jean-Bart was sent to me by a fellow Brit so I could see his tea-stain photos, which I really enjoyed.

I was also drawn to his colorful, abstract series. For this ongoing summer project Leslie spends hours at Coney Island, studying the sea, the sand, the boardwalk, the people, their interactions. His goal is "to get back to 'seeing', to a kind of pure photography not driven so much by narrative or issues, but by light, by color, shape and form. I am completely at the mercy of the elements since the sand and tide move at times faster than a mosquito flying by one's ears in the summer."

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Samples from the 'tea stain' series

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All images © Leslie Jean-Bart

Fellow northern hemisphere dwellers: It's only 5 weeks till the shortest day.

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Bir Nabala, Palestine, West Bank, 2010

Quiet work betrays a bold personality: when complaining on Facebook about a photographer who didn't follow up on my offer of publication, Berlin-based Benedikt Partenheimer cheerily suggested I publish his work instead. After a look through the different series on his website, making an exception to my "no horses" rule, I was most taken by 'Expiration' for its cool, calm look at the West Bank city of Bir Nabala, once a commercial center but now sealed off from Jerusalem by the Wall.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

© Benedikt Partenheimer

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Based in Montreal, Ben Pobjoy is a producer, a creative director, a publisher, and still a young, hungry photographer. His photographs are straight-up, somewhat reflecting his tongue-in-cheek attitude: the latest issue of his brilliant photo newsprint publication 'The Tourist' features 40-pages on Justin Beiber by Alex Sturrock; the accompanying blog demonstrates why The Tourist and aCurator hit it off. "One of the early motivations for founding the Tourist was our collective desire to establish a platform for long-form photo essays." I find Ben's varied activities refreshing, and love his attitude - he offers high-res files of some of his images: "Bare walls are sad walls, so make some prints and spruce up your place."

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

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Louise Dahl-Wolfe, 1988 © Abe Frajndlich

aCurator proudly presents images from a brand-new book by an old friend and supporter, Abe Frajndlich; 'Penelope's Hungry Eyes: Portraits of the Master Photographers' just debuted at Frankfurt Book Fair. Here we touch briefly on the dozens of portraits that Abe has made across three decades. The book is not just packed with the greats but tells a tale of a young photographer, eyes opened by the unique gig of organizing Minor White's library in 1970, finding his place in history.

"The saga began in 1988 when Peter Howe, the picture editor at Life magazine at the time, asked me to photograph the 'Grandes Dames of Photography,' influential figures like Berenice Abbot, Barbara Morgan, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, and Ruth Bernhard. In the middle of the shootings I began to feel that Howe was exercising reverse sexism, by excluding the 'old boys,' and so he gave me a green light to photograph Aaron Siskind, Harry Callahan, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Andreas Feininger, Alfred Eisenstaedt, and others; and I was on my way."

The book is in US stores as of November 1st, and on December 7th the New York Public Library will be host to a discussion between Abe; Henry Adams, author of the introductory text; and Duane Michals, one of the 101 photographers in the book.

Update: OUT NOW: Get yours

The title references Homer's 'Odyssey'

View the full screen magazine photo feature

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Head of Medusa, after Rubens


Look carefully and discover the world of Chadwick Gray & Laura Spector.

These two artists have been working with museums for many years, gaining access to storage facilities, working with the curators to find paintings (mostly 19th century female portraiture), documenting them, and Laura Spector subsequently recreating them on Chadwick Gray's body. The painting process takes between 6 and 18 hours, is then photographed and printed up to the size of the original art work, sometimes a large mural.

Employing the illusion of multistable perception the final photograph often keeps your eye wandering around and around the frame.

"The recreated paintings of these historic portraits recapture the subjects in their own moment in history. The resulting photographs reveal a unification of art combining antiquity, history and technology in a contemporary context."

Most museums seem to not want people viewing their hidden treasures. Then there's examples such as New York's Metropolitan Museum who claim they don't have a storage facility. Now, as Chadwick says, somewhat ironically they themselves have a body of work that hasn't been seen by the public. So the two award-winning artists are putting together an exhibition which will be shown initially at the Pratt MWP Arts Institute in Utica, NY and it is for this they are looking for crowd-funding to produce and frame the works. Information is available over at Kickstarter. Incidentally, Chadwick & Spector are offering one of my favorite rewards: for a pledge at a certain level, wine and cheese via Skype!

There's a TEDx lecture that's fun to watch, which includes a time-lapse video of a 15 hour painting, compressed to 45 seconds.

View the aCurator magazine full screen photo feature.

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