Magazine


Bill_Schwab_wave_trails_2002.jpg

Wave Trails, Black Sand, Iceland, 2002 © Bill Schwab

Bill Schwab and I first crossed paths many years ago when he joined my agency for syndication. I recall some photos of Dee Dee Ramone. The wonderful world of social media brought our paths together again recently and I learned about the other Bill Schwab, who, with a Kodak Brownie and a home darkroom kit received as a gift from his father, taught himself to process film and contact print at age twelve: a widely exhibited and collected fine art photographer, wet plate practitioner and teacher, and producer of stunning landscapes. Bill has made several trips to Iceland and takes workshops out there (one of which 'Iceland: The South Coast' is later this year); his work also often centers around his home base of the Detroit area.

Bill's book 'Gathering Calm' is available in its second edition, and his next book, featuring his work from Belle Isle, Detroit, will be released this year.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Bill_Schwab_dee_dee_ramone_1991.jpg














Dee Dee Ramone, Detroit, 1991 © Bill Schwab

Les_Stone.jpg

© Les Stone

Les Stone, working on a documentary on coal mining in McDowell County, West Virginia, has found his story morphing into a broader look at health care.

"McDowell County is one of the poorest and most remote counties in the United States. In fact Welch, the county seat, had at one time the highest concentration of millionaires in the United States. Thousands of immigrants came from all over the world to work in the coalfields. Now, Welch is scarcely a shadow of its former self. Still, today more coal is taken out of this area than at any time in its history, however, mechanization and non-union mining left the county destitute. In addition, many of the coal companies have treated the people there with disdain and have taken advantage of the miners and their families. .

Black lung, heart disease, diabetes and drug abuse just a few of the problems that have come with poverty in McDowell County. Black lung disease is on the rise among all the miners after several years of decline. Many of the formerly rich towns in the area are now little more than ghost towns and still the only jobs that pay more than minimum wage are the most dangerous jobs in the world - coal mining. Very few people here have health care insurance or access to medical clinics.

In the context of the national economy where many of us are currently suffering, this project is a reminder that some of our fellow countrymen have had it much worse for a long time and they should not be forgotten. In fact, they need to be celebrated as heroes. They are the reason the lights are still on in our homes. However that is not to celebrate coal - we need to find alternatives and quickly - but as in all decisions involving policy, you cannot forget that people's lives are deeply affected." - Les Stone.

Many thanks to Les for the text.

Read an interview with Les, "How A Photojournalist Used To Work," on Stella Kramer's blog.

View the full screen magazine feature.

Karsh_Giacometti_Alberto_02.jpg"Within every man and woman a secret is hidden, and as a photographer it is my task to reveal it if I can. The revelation, if it comes at all, will come in a small fraction of a second with an unconscious gesture, a gleam of the eye, a brief lifting of the mask that all humans wear to conceal their innermost selves from the world. In that fleeting interval of opportunity the photographer must act or lose his prize."

Yousuf Karsh made more than 15,000 sittings across six decades. This feature is but a small selection of the artists he photographed.

There is lots of information and images on the official Karsh website, it's great value so I recommend a long visit.


View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Alberto Giacometti, 1965 © Yousuf Karsh

Denis_Darzacq_Maloyn-Chatelin-Act-31.jpg.jpg

Maloyn Chatelin © Denis Darzacq

In other series Denis Darzacq uses dancers and athletes to capture able bodies in suspension, in urban settings. In 'Act,' 2008-2011, he photographed people with physical limitations, from a variety of backgrounds, careers and locations from the south of France to the north of England and the States; the goal was for each to express their individuality through a collaborative effort with the photographer. Denis worked with institutions, dance and sports groups to find eager participants. "Everyone, from the moment he decided to play the game, took an active part in the image by choosing gestures, attitudes, clothing, a place."

This body of work was brought to my attention by friend and colleague Jerry Fielder who enjoyed Denis' exhibition in Paris at Galerie VU last November. Denis has won a World Press Photo Award, and been exhibited and collected by multiple institutions, and is a member of Agence VU. Visit Denis' website for more, in particular check out Hyper, and La Chute.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Thanks to Denis for providing his interview with Virginie Chardin.

Michel_Leroy.jpg

© Michel Leroy

Here is another great photographer I met at a portfolio review.* Michel Leroy's gritty portraits of Rally Bikers depict a microcosm of the biking world at large.

"Attending motorcycle rallies throughout the American West allows me to create portraits of riders ranging from 7-year-old kids on 90cc hill climbers, to middle age firemen on 1200cc road bikes, to sunburnt grandparents on 1800cc luxury touring marvels. The patches, leather and tattoos are trappings of a lifestyle that riders have chosen as a release from the everyday obligations of a 9 to 5 weekday existence."

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

I really appreciate photographers such as Michel who take time out of their already-burdensome digital imaging processes to write and maintain a fun and interesting blog.

*NYC Fotoworks

Danny_Ghitis_LandofOs.jpg

Bike Rack, 2010 © Danny Ghitis

In this series, Danny Ghitis explores the reality of life in the aftermath of evil.

Auschwitz had for a long time been a German name for the Polish town of Oświęcim and was made the official name by the Germans after they invaded Poland in September 1939.

"For hundreds of years before the German occupation, Jews and Christians lived harmoniously in the town of about 12,000. After the war, the leftover chemical factory was exploited by the new communist regime and the town grew to about 50,000 inhabitants. Now in its fourth political chapter since the 1930s, Oświęcim hangs in the balance between the rapidly developing Polish economy and its own uncertain future." Thanks to Danny for photos and text.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.


Jen_Osborne_Net_Generation.jpg

Towards the end of 2011 I reviewed the portfolio of a photographer* who suggested I might like the work and personality of a young woman who had assisted him, and I was happy to be formally introduced to Jennifer Osborne. I had heard Jen speak about her work in the summer of 2010 at Aperture as part of the program around the publication of the book 'reGeneration: tomorrow's photographers today'; I was moved by her series 'Tough Blood' about the mentally ill, suicide-prone residents of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. However, I chose this project, Net Generation, which she photographed in July 2009, to kick off the new year.

It has been suggested that in China more than 10% of the country's 100 million teenage web surfers fall prey to excessive gaming and online activity. Jennifer Osborne visited Doctor Tao Ran's recovery program for Internet addicts, established in 2004. The young people Jen photographed are in summer video game rehab at the Beijing Region Military Hospital.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

The series was originally produced with the support of COLORS Magazine.

*Carlo Hindian

Abe_Frajndlich_Ruth_Bernhard.jpg.jpg

Ruth Bernhard, San Francisco, 1988 © Abe Frajndlich

Abe Frajndlich gave me free reign to put together a second series from his stunning new book, 'Penelope's Hungry Eyes' which is packed with over 100 portraits of the master photographers. If your favourites are not here in my edit I'm sure you'll find them in the book.

"With a single-mindedness and tenacity which can only be compared to Penelope's faith in the return of her husband Odysseus, Abe's "hungry eyes" pursued the goal of photographing photographers for generations. In the course of over thirty years he compiled an ever-growing portrait collection of famous colleagues, 101 of which now appear in his new book."

On December 7th, 2011, the New York Public Library will be host to a discussion between Frajndlich; Henry Adams, author of the introductory text; and Duane Michals, one of the  photographers featured in the book.

Stanley_Kubrick.jpg

Police Athletic League Boxing

The fortunate folk at VandM have partnered with the Museum of the City of New York on exclusive, editioned prints selected from Stanley Kubrick's wonderful negatives archive. Shooting for Look Magazine from 1945 - 1950, when he left to pursue film-making, Kubrick produced a bunch of stellar stills.

Available to the public for the first time, at $250 for an 11x14, you might be able to treat yourself. 

The majority of the proceeds go to the Museum.

All photographs by Stanley Kubrick, courtesy of VandM, where you'll find lots more info.


ole_elfenkaemper.jpg

Born in Germany and based in Stockholm, photographer Ole Elfenkämper has produced a couple of documentary series in Albania recently: one covers environmental concerns, and the other, which I'm happy we could put together into a feature here, is about a strike by chrome miners that lasted three months and is the longest industrial action since the fall of communism.

Bulqiza is a town in eastern Albania and is one of the richest areas in chrome in the Balkans. On July 4th its chrome miners downed their tools to protest for better working conditions, a wage increase, and changes to the administration of the mine for the sake of its future.

The miners started their protest in Bulqiza but after 16 days of general strikes and protests they went to the capital, Tirana, where they camped in a park nearby and went each day for five days to protest in front of Prime Minister Sali Berisha's office. With no hearings by the government forthcoming they decided to return to Bulqiza, and a group of 15 miners went 1400 meters underground to begin a hunger strike.

On October 8th, after three months of strike and long negotiations, the miners went back to work having agreed a deal with the management which included a wage increase. Just twelve days later, 1600m underground a massive explosion took place and one miner died and two out of seven wounded were fighting for their lives.

After the incident, the Union for Inspection and Rescue of Mines closed the mine until the company fulfills the security requirements for the 'galleries.' With the mine closed and the owners having not paid the workers during the months of the strike, the lives of the miners have become more and more difficult. They are forced to risk their lives working in other, sometimes abandoned, mines. As a result of working in unsafe conditions another deadly accident took place on November 11th in the chrome mining area in Bulqiza, bringing the total to 15 deaths in the last three years. Prosecutors are still investigating.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

© Ole Elfenkämper

Thanks to Ole for the photographs and text for this feature

Recent Entries

Categories

Links