Magazine


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Untitled, 2009, from the series 'Detroit' © Ian Willms

With a powerful spread of talent working around the world, Boreal Collective is an example of a small group of enlightened photographers coming together with their own voices and their own brand. With agencies disappearing and editorial assignments of any import few and far between, I expect to see more like this in the future.

In this feature, images from:

Ian Willms: "The photographs in 'Detroit' were made with a $30 plastic camera, manufactured en-masse in the 1980s for working-class families in China. The camera uses 120 format film and is equipped with a single element plastic lens. The body of the camera leaks light and scratches the negatives, while the primitive lens blurs and distorts the images. This camera was the absolute minimum amount of equipment available for me to create this series of photographs; anything less would have been ineffective and anything more would have been excessive."

Jonathan Taggart: "Ninety per cent of ecovillages and intentional communities don't make it past the planning stage or fail within the first year, and it is easy to see why: environmental ideals come in a variety of strengths and focuses, and the shared goals that initially unite members can later widen the rifts between them. While Whole Village has moved steadily towards its goal of sustainability since its founding just a few years ago, the success of the community rests as much on achieving social sustainability as environmental sustainability."

Rafal Gersak: "On a Friday afternoon... many can be found spending time with friends at a local pool, flying kites or visiting a nearby lake. For some there are even dog fights and the country's only golf course is located on the outskirts of the city. In these moments, the conflict seems a very distant thing. But reminders of war's long-held grasp on Afghan society are hard to miss."

Brett Gundlock: "The powerful, violent moves intimidate at first; but the rawness of the arm swings and chest pops is the voice of the dancer. This story is about a group of friends, each from a completely different background, brought together by Krump."

Aaron Vincent Elkaim: "Aaron specializes in editorial photography and has prioritized his personal work focusing on documentary photography with a cultural investment. He believes that the greatest photography is open ended; he doesn't believe in a beginning middle or end to a photo story but simply wishes to illuminate it, urging the viewer to ask questions rather than simply providing answers."  

View the magazine full screen photo feature

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Dave Land is a British-born, Berlin-based photographer, who was first inspired to create by the photographs of O. Winston Link. With an exhibition on in Berlin right now, aCurator presents a selection of Land's images of decay and destruction. They are taken in and around Berlin and capture what is left of history - slowly deteriorating and subject to vandalism. You can see the show at Galerie am Rathaus, Berlin-Schöneberg, until November 25th.*

"I first need a motif which I know will enable me to create something unique. Often, I will revisit a location to improve the shot if necessary. I use layers quite a lot, but hopefully subtly. I have some custom layers which I will apply to an image, sometimes all over the image or maybe just in one small area - it depends. I may work on an image for a day or two, sometimes a week. I try various ideas out until I have something I'm happy with and often that never happens! Each image that I do finish though is unique."

View the full screen magazine photo feature

*Exhibition extended by popular demand, through November 28.
Stage Left © Dave Land

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Another accomplished youngster. I'd seen one of Argentinian photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg's images illustrating a fiction piece in the New Yorker earlier this year. More recently, when I saw he was part of the Brighton Photo Festival, I visited his website and was just as thrilled by his work as I was the first time I saw it. I am particularly drawn to this series, 'Borders'; as Alejandro puts it, he is working with photography "in the border of the reality. Creating fictional scenarios with real people and situations." Chaskielberg shot on 6x6 positive film with a Rolleiflex.

Other projects include a unique series on the Argentine financial crisis in 2001, and more recently his ongoing project 'The High Tide: Native Islanders and the Community of the Paraná River Delta' which documents the Guaraní culture, and for which he received the 2009 Burn Emerging Photographer Grant. Chaskielberg was included in PDN's 30, 2009, 'Our Choice of New and Emerging Photographers to Watch'. And speaking of watching, here's Chaskielberg being interviewed in Brighton.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

© Alejandro Chaskielberg

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aCurator is proud to present images from the digital exhibition '100 Portraits - 100 Photographers: Selections from the FlakPhoto.com Archive'.

November 6-13th is Fotoweek DC, and as part of the event, the city of Washington will be transformed into a nighttime gallery. The festival has traditionally leaned toward photojournalism but is introducing an art photo component with the 100 Portraits projection this year. Andy Adams, editor and publisher of FlakPhoto.com and Larissa Leclair, photography writer and curator, are presenting an exhibition drawn from the digital archive that has developed over four years of daily updates on Flak Photo. In the new tradition of online curation and celebrating the burgeoning online photo community that Flak represents, the two made their selections together in a series of Skype video chats.

"As an added fine art component to the NightGallery projections, this screening features 100 dynamic portraits from an exciting group of contemporary photographers in all stages of their careers, each selected from the digital archive on FlakPhoto.com. Our decision to highlight work from this website celebrates the role that a thriving online photography community plays in the discovery and dissemination of work produced by significant artists in the Internet Era. Contemporary photo culture is marked by a continuous flow of images online, and our aim is to take a moment to recognize some of the noteworthy photographs published in this ever-expanding archive over the past four years. In this context, projected several times larger than life, these portraits look back at us and embody a louder voice in the discourse of the gaze." - Andy Adams + Larissa Leclair


To learn more about the contributing artists and to see all 100 portraits, view the full online exhibition.

100 Portraits -- 100 Photographers: Selections from the FlakPhoto.com Archive from FlakPhoto.com on Vimeo.


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ClampArt is very pleased to present an exhibition of work by artist Lori Nix, her first solo show at the gallery.

Since the mid-1990s, Lori Nix has been building tiny dioramas in her studio in Brooklyn which she then photographs with a large-format 8 x 10-inch camera. The monumental prints that are produced showcase the wondrous and obsessive care that goes into every minute detail of Nix's breathtakingly convincing miniatures.

For her newest body of work, "The City" (2005-2010), Nix has been constructing indoor, post-apocalyptic, urban scenes imagining what the city may look like when all the humans are dead and gone.  As critic, Sidney Lawrence, wrote in 'Art in America':  "The implications of Nix's tableaux never seem to stop.  Oddly endearing, terrifying and often electrifyingly plausible, they prod us to ponder the fact that, like it or not, our fate is uncertain."

Due to the great pains the artist takes in attending to every last feature of her constructions, some of the artworks, such as her new masterpiece, "Map Room," require up to six months to realize. Thus, Nix's scenes are highly planned in advance, and her output notably small.  ClampArt has been patiently waiting three years for the artist to produce enough work to mount a solo exhibition.

Lori Nix has received several photography awards. She is a 2004 New York Foundation for the Arts Individual Artist Grant recipient.  In 2001 she was awarded a residency at Light Work (an internationally recognized photography organization in Syracuse, New York). Nix was a 1999 recipient of an Ohio Arts Council Individual Artist Grant; a 1998 recipient of a Greater Columbus Ohio Arts Grant; and she participated in the Artist in the Market-place program at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in 2000.  Museum exhibitions include 'Fresh! Contemporary Takes on Nature and Allegory' at the Museum of Glass, Tacoma, Washington; 'Picturing Eden' and "Vital Signs" at the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York; Katonah Museum of Art's 'I Love the Burbs' in Katonah, New York; and 'Innocence' at the New Britain Museum of Art, New Britain, Connecticut; to name just a few. Her work is represented in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; and the El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, Texas; among many others. - Brian Clamp, Director.

The City opens at ClampArt, NYC, on November 4th and runs through December 18th, 2010.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Control Room, 2010 © Lori Nix

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aCurator is proud to support Aperture Foundation.

Paul Strand (born 1890, New York; died 1976, Orgeval, France) was one of the great photographers of the twentieth century. As a youth, he studied under Lewis Hine at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School, going on to draw acclaim from such illustrious sources as Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen. After World War II, Strand traveled around the world - from New England to Ghana, France to the Outer Hebrides - to photograph, and in the process created a dynamic and significant body of work. During the 1970s, major exhibitions of his work were displayed internationally, cementing his reputation as one of the greatest American photographers.

'Paul Strand in Mexico' is an exhibition of over a hundred photographic works including vintage prints and previously unseen documents and ephemera related to Strand's time in Mexico and is accompanied by a printed volume that documents the complete photographic works made by Strand during his 1932-34 trip to Mexico as well as a second journey in 1966 -- a total of 234 photographs, 123 of which have never before been published.

The exhibition is at Aperture through November 13th but you can see Strand's 'The Mexican Portfolio', presented by Aperture, at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, through January 2, 2011.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Woman and child, Hidalgo, 1933, courtesy and copyright
Aperture/The Paul Strand Archive

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When reviewing the book 'reGeneration²' from Aperture earlier this year, I noticed the mysterious photograph by Kalle Kataila. Investigating further I discovered this ethereal body of work that engulfed me and took me on a journey across the world and through time. Kalle is "a Helsinki-based photographer whose work is based around concepts of landscape and how personal narratives attribute to our understandings of these spaces." Born in 1977, Kalle is young yet thoroughly well collected and exhibited - across Europe, in the US, China, Russia and Korea, both as part of the reGeneration² touring show and independently, and with work in the Finnish State Art Collections, Museé de l'Elysée in Lausanne and more. He's also a member of the impressive Helsinki School.

The reGeneration² exhibition travels to Milan in November and comes to New York in January 2011.

View the magazine full screen photo feature.

Buy a print of 'Shepherd'. Buy 'reGeneration²'.

Read an interview with Kalle from the National Post, Canada.

Shepherd, 2008 © Kalle Kataila

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Abby Ross is young and very hard working. I attended the opening of her first solo show, an event she essentially single-handedly put together last month at 92Y in Tribeca, Manhattan and which featured these images. They were taken during her recent travels in Senegal, capturing the people, landscape, and mood of the region.

"I've often been attracted to this essential energy that shines through where the spiritual far outweighs the material. I am interested in the poetic character of things, in the small, seemingly unimportant. There is hidden beauty in the ordinary, and great beauty in the overlooked. Little things are big, less is more. Imperfection is beautiful. Paradoxes such as these fascinate me." Abby Ross, October 2010


Haddim and Maguet © Abby Ross

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Lee Grant is an Australian photographer just graduating with her Masters from the Australian National University. Based in Canberra, Lee has produced several bodies of work from which this edit was made, including 'Sudanese Portraits From Suburbia' which documents this growing population of immigrants and 'Belco Pride' about the northernmost suburbs of Canberra. Lee is featured in the new book 'Hijacked 2, New Australian and German Photography', and is the recent winner of the prestigious William and Winifred Bowness Photography Prize at Monash Gallery of Art in Melbourne.

Lee is also the curator of Light Journeys, a new website that promotes and supports Australian women working in photography.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Watch Lee talk about her work.

Charlie © Lee Grant

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On the Artists Wanted website, a woman photographing her son dressed as a girl piqued my interest.

"Photography was a way of being able to participate in a world where I didn't normally feel I fit in. I started photographing my children but quickly became known for capturing other people's children as they were seen by their parents. I was in love with the challenge and process of connecting with my subjects. No matter how a photo shoot started, there was always mutual trust and respect by the end. Through this process I learned that energy, positive energy, is contagious, and what I was searching for in my life was coming through in my images.

'The Many Faces of Hambone' was inspired by my mother's shallowness and how the emphasis on appearance stunted my emotional and spiritual growth. These images of my 9 year old son best illustrate my intent to show that a beautiful child does not translate into beauty within. I thank my mother now as I understand her own insecurities and lack of love for herself kept her from accepting me. It has taught me to appreciate my life and has inspired me to be a better mother, person and artist. He is not going to be a cross dresser or gay because I dressed him up; he is going to be a beautiful, independent, confident human being because I adore and accept him for who he is. I believe the photographs are beautiful, and my son looks pretty darn cute and convincing as a girl; the images individually and as a series are purposely and consistently meant to be emotionless and non contagious. The audience emotionally should be left wanting more." - Hilary Mullarkey, September 2010

View the magazine full screen photo feature.

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