Magazine


AdamKrause_07.jpg

"Few things in this world make sense to me. Photography, and the lyrics of a man who sounds like a muppet crooning, happen to be two exceptions. I am attracted to people who find a way to manifest their obsessive qualities into something physical. 'Carnivores and Destructors'* documents people infatuated with the pop singer Morrissey and the various dimensions of this fixation.  

Enjoying a band is an abstract idea - the individuals I chose to photograph translate this into something beyond just music and integrate these concepts into a tangible experience and way of life.  Somewhere in this self imposed isolation, comfort and safety are found, and that is what fascinates me." - Adam Krause

It isn't every day that a submission speaks to me in the way Adam Krause's did. We share a huge love of Morrissey, and with these great photographs this was an obvious feature for aCurator.


© Adam Krause  * (lyrics from 'Ouija Board Ouija Board' - Ed)

Jason_Florio.jpg

"I was working on a travel story in Ethiopia when I heard about the estimated 80,000 children living on the streets of Addis Ababa. I extended my stay by a few days and start researching and photographing the story. Through a local NGO I was able to make contact with Bruke, a 15 year old boy, who like thousands of other street children had sought refuge underground, making his home in a small drainage hole in the middle of the road. The Merkato commercial center of Addis Ababa has become the de facto place for Ethiopian children escaping rural poverty, AIDS, abusive families, the clutches of indentured servitude and human trafficking. Thinking they have found a haven, they instead find the Merkato a harsh and dangerous environment. These children face the obvious daily struggles of finding food, protection and safety, and are forced to deal with the lingering and constant threat of sexual predators who prey on the vulnerable street children. With no social welfare system and the lack of enforceable child rights in Ethiopia, the children find themselves, in essence, in a state of civil death - the legal status of a person who is alive but who has been deprived of the rights and privileges of a citizen or a member of society.

I spent two days with Bruke, learning about what brought him to the streets and how he survives. For a short while I was able to get sporadic reports on his well-being from my fixer who passed through the area. For the last 2 1/2 years I have not had any news. I am planning to return to Ethiopia later in the year to expand on the work I started there, and with the hopes of finding Bruke again." - Jason Florio

View the magazine feature.

Learn more
.

© Jason Florio

John_Cyr_BARBARA_MENSCH'S.jpgJohn Cyr is a photographer and a master printer - he owns and runs Silver 68, a traditional black and white lab in Brooklyn. He is a faculty member at ICP and is in his final semester pursuing an MFA from the Photography, Video and Related Media Department from the School of Visual Arts.

John is contacting photographers, their studios, estates, assistants, to determine whether any developer trays remain in their collections. Unfortunately, a lot have been discarded over the years, but as you can see in his ongoing project John has successfully photographed several. Enjoy letting your imagination run wild as to which of your favorites might have been printed in these.

"From the mid nineteenth century until today, silver gelatin printing has been one of the most utilized photographic processes. From classic reportage to fine art photography, the majority of it was performed in a black and white darkroom until the mid-1970's. As recently as 2000, black and white darkroom classes still served as the location for introduction to photography courses.

The digital advances in photography over the past ten years have been remarkable. Digital manipulation is found in most contemporary work, even within these developer tray photographs. This shift from film-based to digital imaging is occurring at a rapid rate, which is why photographing developer trays is a timely endeavor. Many photographers, printmakers, and photographers' archivists have already discarded or thrown out their developer trays because they believed they were no longer significant or useful. Irving Penn's developer trays have been thrown away, as have those of master printer Richard Benson. I am photographing available developer trays so that the photography community will remember specific, tangible printing tools that have been a seminal part of the photographic experience for the past hundred years.  By titling each tray with its owner's name, I reference the historical significance of these objects in a minimal manner that evokes thought and introspection about what images have passed through each individual tray." - John Cyr

View the magazine feature.

Barbara Mensch's Developer Tray ©  John Cyr

Small_AriellaAndCrow.jpg

There's something super special about Sarah Small.

Of the portfolio reviews I've attended, Sarah's work, which I first saw 2 or 3 years ago (thank you ASMP), has been the most enduring. The strangest of juxtapositions reigned throughout her book, highlighting brilliant bruises and silvery stretch marks. Since then she has developed the Delirium Constructions which include her Tableau Vivant events - multifarious models assembled into a series of suspended interactions. Startling, sincere images that speak to the viewer again and again.

Recommended watching: the Tableau Vivant videos at Living Picture Projects are beautifully moving, and set to the incredible tones of Sarah's a Cappella quartet Black Sea Hotel (seemingly, skill is in no short supply chez Small).

View the feature.

Ariella and Crow © Sarah Small

Parisi_GoldenSoup.jpg

Mary Parisi really sees.

"Like many others today, I see food as a complicated comfort. This aspect of being attracted and repelled carries through in much of my work. I think it is part of looking at things as they are. Often my photographs delve into abstraction but the real, sometimes unsightly, aspects of life are still present; there is the bit of animal tissue floating in the soup.

The people in Tolstoy's novels have the possibility for both good and evil and this makes one believe in the truthfulness of the writing, to believe that something real from life has been crafted in to the novel. I hope that the same is true in my photographs, that I have allowed the subject to bring with it those aspects from life that might not seem to fit with the estheticized object, so that through discord an authentic view of life is captured."

There are more great series on Mary's website - check out 'Oral' and 'Sleep'.

Parisi has a solo show of food and soup at the Griffin Museum in Boston, through June 20th, 2010. 

View the magazine feature.

C prints are available in 20"x20" and/or 30"x30"

Textured Soup, 2008 © Mary Parisi

Jaimie_Warren.jpg

In one order or another, I saw Jaimie Warren's monograph (published by Tim Barber's Tiny Vices and available from Aperture) and a wonderful wall of small prints with Higher Pictures at the Association of International Photography Art Dealers show in New York, and she stuck firmly in my head. Perhaps there's just not been enough joy in the photography I've seen in recent years, so I am delighted to present a sampling of her self-portraits and humorous observations.

Jaimie Warren is a curator, performance artist, photographer, and co-founder of a non-profit community arts program and faux public access television show called 'Whoop Dee Doo'. With a website titled 'Don't You Feel Better' you know you've been set up for a good time.

View the feature.

© Jaimie Warren

Burke_Jesse_Father.jpg

View the feature.

Guest curator Brian Clamp's preview of Burke's exhibition at ClampArt.

The intertidal zone is the ground that is exposed to air at low tide and is under water at high tide. It is an intermediated place where opposites commingle and coexist. Jesse Burke's series 'Intertidal' addresses the ambivalent domain between the heroic ideal of masculinity and the true reality of being male. Through the juxtaposition of photographs, Burke constructs an autobiographical investigation of the incongruousness of the fragility of masculinity.

Burke writes "I photograph my life and the lives of the men in my social and family circles in an attempt to understand from where our ideas of masculinity originate. I am most drawn to the moments that are representative of vulnerability or emasculation; where there is a presence of a rupture or wound inflicted in some way, whether it be physical, emotional, or metaphorical. I employ concepts such as male bonding and peer influence, masculine rites and rituals, homosocial desire, physical exertion, and our connection to one another as well as the landscape that we interact within to expose these instances."

Burke sets his subjects against the backdrop of his native New England, both embracing and critiquing his own absorption and assimilation of the masculine ideal and his ultimate construction of self.

Jesse Burke is an instructor at the Rhode Island School of Design where he received his MFA in photography in 2005. His work has been exhibited in such cities as New York, Tokyo, Milan, Stockholm, Madrid, Miami, and Los Angeles. The exhibition at ClampArt is complemented by the artist's monograph of the same title from Decode (Seattle, Washington, 2008) with an essay by critic Nate Lippens.

© Jesse Burke, "Father", 2006, Courtesy of ClampArt, New York City

john_angerson.jpg

View the feature.

John Angerson lives and works in London. His photographs illustrate several books including 'St. George's Crypt. Entertaining Angels' about a homeless centre in Leeds, and the fascinating 'Love Power Sacrifice' about Britain's Jesus Army, an evangelical religious sect. I recommend 'Sustain' on John's website, a beautiful project on dying and displaced fishing communities.

Sleeping Rough: Living on the streets of Britain.

"The latest local government homelessness statistics suggest approximately 80,000 households in England are homeless. With this in mind, photographer John Angerson spent a year engaging with a group of society that is often considered problematic for image-makers.  The most common depiction of this marginalized group is imagery of people with weather beaten faces living in extreme conditions. Rather than depict the despair of being homeless Angerson wanted to convey a feeling of what it is like to live on the streets and it was this concept that gave him the impetus to create landscape images at night.

After conducting interviews with the service users of hostels and homeless charities Angerson began to build up a selection of locations across England known for being destinations for overnight sleeping. By using only the artificial light found at night he was forced to make exposures of up to 90 minutes for each photograph. This more oblique approach of documenting the dimly lit stairwells of shopping malls, or strange corners of tourist areas that would normally be packed with day trippers, invites the viewer into another world, evoking a sense of how it might feel to sleep rough."

Neville Street, Leeds © John Angerson

Kenne_Karaoke_CHINA.jpg

View the feature
.

Ingvar Kenne is a man with a keen eye and a sense of humor - the opener for his website might have you in stitches. He is a prolific photographer with an abundance of cool projects to enjoy. Born in Sweden and dividing his time between New York and Sydney, Australia, Kenne has been regularly exhibited worldwide since he graduated in 1991. He has published 2 monographs, shot campaigns for Toyota, IBM, Sony and Microsoft, and produces breath-taking travel photography and portraits.

We decided to publish Karaoke, an ongoing project spanning several Asian countries.

"Karaoke bars and clubs are casual entertainment up front, and, sometimes, facades for brothels, drug dens and massage parlors with a happy ending out back. They play an important social role and are relevant to the positive makeup of the neighbourhood, but they also become places of despair, loneliness and injustice. These images try to move within the space where the two opposite emotions meet."

Kenne is repped in the US by Vernon Jolly.

Menlian, China © Ingvar Kenne

Sharkey_DeMarques.jpg

"It's hard to believe that when I began this project in 2006 the issue of gay youth was just beginning to gain national attention, most notably with a cover story in Time Magazine titled 'The Battle Over Gay Teens' (Oct. 2005). The article stated 'Kids are disclosing their homosexuality with unprecedented regularity - and they are doing so much younger. The average gay person now comes out just before or after graduating high school. In 1997 there were approximately 100 gay-straight alliances (GSAs) - clubs for gay and gay-friendly kids - on U.S. high school campuses. Today there are at least 3,000 GSAs - nearly 1 in 10 high schools has one. In the 2004-05 academic year, GSAs were established at U.S. schools at the rate of three per day.'

Since then, in just four years, the issue has become a kind of fait accompli. Americans may continue to argue about teenage sexual expression, school sanctioned GSAs and gay marriage, but clearly all are here to stay.

The idea for this project arose from my own desire as a gay teenager to be given a voice. I desperately wanted to be made valid in the eyes of my peers. Coming out (and of age) in the 80's proved to be quite difficult for me and many others. I'll never forget being beat-up by a high-school classmate as I'm sure all the other kids who suffered because of their sexuality will not forget. It was precisely this kind of willful, painful defiance that I wanted to capture in these portraits. But what you may also see is the delight that is the domain of a new generation... the sheer joy of being able to stand up and be seen without shame." - M. Sharkey, Brooklyn, April 2010

So far, this project has taken Sharkey to New York, California, Colorado, Florida & Washington State.

View the feature.

See more of the project.

DeMarques © M. Sharkey

Recent Entries

Categories

Links