Photographers


Harvey_Stein_01.jpg


Hot off the presses is this fab new book from Harvey Stein.

"The first photographic encounter renowned New York street photographer Harvey Stein had with Harlem was when he documented the annual African American parade on Malcolm X Boulevard in 1990. Swept away by the spirit and humanity of the legendary neighborhood and its inhabitants, Stein continued to photograph Harlem for 23 years from 1990 to 2012. His close-up, evocative portraits of the people of Harlem are published for the first time in 'Harlem Street Portraits' (Schiffer Publishing, October 2013). Accompanying the photographs are essays by African American activist, writer and teacher Herb Boyd, and writer and third generation New Yorker, Miss Rosen."

"No amount of words can deliver what one glance can, and chances are that one glance into Harvey's book and the engrossing images will lead to another. And if you look with enough love and introspection, I will not be surprised if you find something personal, something reminiscent of places you have been and people you would be glad to know." - Herb Boyd

Harvey will be signing copies on Wednesday, October 15th, 2013, at Rizzoli, NYC. 

Harvey_Stein_02.jpg

Harvey_Stein_03.jpg

Harvey_Stein_04_01.jpg

All images © Harvey Stein 

Harvey_Stein_Harlem-Rizzoli.jpg

Coming up in NYC: November 14th, a conversation with Herb Boyd and Harvey Stein, and book signing, at Sister's Uptown Bookstore; November 17th, Talk and Book Signing, B&H Event Space.

Michele Ravasio CARS_1_OK.jpg


Michele Ravasio sent these over from Milan, part of his project 'The Other Cars.'

"There are SUVs, there are Smarts, and then... then there are the other cars."

"The ones you do not expect, the ones you should better demolish, the ones that consume too much, the old-fashioned ones, the ones that you even don't know how they manage to start, but that are still there, parked along Milanese streets, some of them with a meek look, a sad face, others still with a proud and confident bearing. Those muzzles, those flanks, those headlights, those bumpers, those plates, and above all the owners of those vehicles, seem having a say on what we are experiencing, on this difficult period, between economic crisis and globalization."

Michele Ravasio CARS_7_OK.jpg

Michele Ravasio CARS_12_OK.jpg

Michele Ravasio CARS_15_OK.jpg

Michele Ravasio CARS_20_OK.jpg

Michele Ravasio CARS_21_OK.jpg

Michele Ravasio CARS_25_OK.jpg

Michele Ravasio CARS_16_OK.jpg

All images © Michele Ravasio

Mike_Tittel_05.jpg


A selection of fun, ambiguous images from Mike Tittel's ongoing series 'Behavior.' 

"I am very interested in how photography can tell a global, universal story. Through visual approaches that rely on consistency and honesty, I can tell human stories no matter where I am in the world. Themes of disconnectedness, being on the verge of change and human behaviors are what my work explores."

Mike_Tittel_03.jpg


Mike_Tittel_02.jpg

Mike_Tittel_01.jpg

All images © Mike Tittel

Laura_Glabman_2.jpg


Long Island resident Laura Glabman's project reminds us of the devastation caused by Superstorm Sandy, in the shape of dead trees. She says: "'The Spring After The Storm' is a continuation of my 'Neighborhood Investigations' series where I look towards the familiar to find the groundwork for my shooting sprees. It takes years of gardening, pruning, and shaping to create and maintain the identity of a neighborhood. In one day, this foundation of hopes and dreams was swept away in the flood waters of the hurricane."

Laura_Glabman_1.jpg

Laura_Glabman_3.jpg

Laura_Glabman_5.jpg

Laura_Glabman_6.jpg

Laura_Glabman_7.jpg

Laura_Glabman_9.jpg

Laura_Glabman_4.jpg

All images © Laura Glabman

"The dead trees appear everywhere in the neighborhood. Homeowners, who had to deal with repairing and replacing the contents of their homes, had no choice but to put fixing the exterior of their properties on hold as they recover their living space. It's been almost a year since the storm, and still my neighborhood has yet to fully recover. These photographs provide testimony that as with the change of seasons, there is hope for renewal but it will take a very long time."

Paolo_Woods_07.jpg

Julio Jean Pierre, a host on Télévision Nationale d'Haïti (TNH), being made up a few minutes before going on air. Behind him, a bust of Alexandre Pétion, president of the Haitian Republic from 1806 until his death in 1818, one of the fathers of the nation.


I am happy to publish a selection of images from World Press Photo award winner and INSTITUTE artist, Paolo Woods. "With journalist Arnaud Robert, he tracked down Haitian society's invisibles, its absurd flaws and hidden aspects. He investigated the economic elites, NGOs, the profusion of FM radios, American evangelists. Month after month, he came to realize that all the substitution powers that had come to save Haiti were actually replacing Haitian authorities. And yet, in a country whose leaders have failed ever since it was founded, the population's desire for a State remains unaltered."

This colourful, insightful long-term project on the situation in Woods' adopted home of Haiti has been collected into a book to be published by Photosyntheses this month. Woods will exhibit at Photoville 2013 in Brooklyn, NY (September 19-29), and for three months at the Musée Elysée, Lausanne, opening September 20. 

Can't make it? Enjoy this selection.

Paolo_Woods_11.jpg

Radio Lumiere 90.9 FM. This is one of the oldest protestant radios. It has stations all over the country and is financed by the American and German Baptiste churches. Pastor Emile Alnève has just read from the Bible and is about to lead the listeners in prayer.

Paolo_Woods_12.jpg

Radio Paradis 92.3FM. William is spinning from a building still under construction a few meters from the sea in the village of Tiburon, while his friends have come to check on him. The equipment for the radio has been paid by a 'Diaspora' - a Haitian living in the US. The radio is powered by solar panels and broadcasts ten hours a day.

Paolo_Woods_04.jpg

The construction of 3,000 houses, 15 kilometers north of Port-au-Prince. The project, whose cost is evaluated at $44 million, is managed by the government and financed by the Venezuelan 'Petro Caribe' fund. Morne à Cabri.

Paolo_Woods_03.jpg

Tent city on a soccer field that belongs to a church. After the earthquake, inhabitants of makeshift districts (Jalousie, seen in the background) sometimes pitched tents in the camps to benefit from NGO help. The most visible camps in public squares were dismantled. Pétion-Ville.

Paolo_Woods_05.jpg

The American religious organization Global Compassion Network supplies houses built from grain silos, a gift of the Monsanto company. Torbek. 

Paolo_Woods_15.jpg

In Port-au-Prince's Notre Dame Cathedral, a man looks for iron to recycle from the ruins of the earthquake. 

Paolo_Woods_09.jpg

A game of dominos among police officers who are in charge of the security for the president. The losers of the game are designated as 'dogs' and forced to wear something that attracts the ridicule of passersby. Here, they are tied together with electric wire. Presidential Palace, Port-au-Prince.

Paolo_Woods_13.jpg

The Croix-des-Bossales Market, where pèpès, second-hand clothing from the United States, is sorted, resized and sold wholesale. Port-au-Prince.

Paolo_Woods_02.jpg

Mario Andrésol, though he left the Haitian National Police, still enjoys continuous protection supplied by the Ministry of the Interior. Belleville, Pétion-Ville.


Eric Jean-Baptiste, owner of Père Eternel, Haiti's second biggest lottery. Lottery, or Borlette as it is called in Haiti, is ubiquitous in the country and according to one estimate Haitians spend as much as $1.5 billion per year on the Borlette making it the biggest industry in the country. The son of one of Papa Doc's Tonton Macoutes, Jean-Baptiste has utter contempt for the mulatto elite that rules the core of the Haitian economy. Port au Prince.

Paolo_Woods_08.jpg

Michel Joseph Martelly in front of the presidential palace destroyed by the January 12, 2010, earthquake. Port-au-Prince.

Paolo_Woods_10.jpg

A borlette office. Haitians invest two billion dollars every year in these private lotteries - nearly a quarter of the GNP. They are often referred to as "banks" since the poor invest their money in them. Camp Perrin.


Special thanks to Anna-Maria Pfab, Cultural Manager, INSTITUTE

Jose_Porroche_viejo.jpg


Some light-heartedness from Barcelona-based self-proclaimed amateur photographer Jose Porroche because, why not? #BumBookends

Jose_Porroche_julio.jpg

Jose_Porroche_chorizo.jpg

Jose_Porroche_img3981.jpg

Jose_Porroche_bar.jpg

Jose_Porroche_toro.jpg

All images © Jose Porroche


Since 2009, Douglas Ljungkvist has been photographing the Ocean Beach neighborhood of New York's Fire Island, before and after hurricane Sandy. Long story short, Doug is compiling his impressive photographs into a book and his fundraiser is in the final throes. Chip in, so I can get my copy!

Doug_Ljunkvist_01.jpg

"This project is study of a unique place in the American landscape that appeals to my vernacular taste and sense of style and order. As a photographer I am interested in the cottages still showing signs of a bygone era when wood paneling, vibrant colors, and kitsch decorations were the order of the day. I always felt it was a race against time to visually preserve the cottages. That was based on the rapid pace of cottages being renovated and modernized to attract more potential vacationers on the competitive rental market. 

But instead it was nature that pushed me to continue the project after I thought it was completed, due to the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in October, 2012. Once access was restored to the barrier island in early 2013 I resumed photographing extensively with a focus on the cottages facing the ocean and hardest hit. Since then 35 of the 39 ocean-facing cottages have been demolished. Hundreds more will need to be gutted or demolished due to the damage from standing water when the ocean and bay waters met."

Read about the history of Ocean Beach over on Doug's Kickstarter page whilst you browse which reward you're going to spring for...

Doug_Ljunkvist_03.jpg

Doug_Ljunkvist_02.jpg

Doug_Ljunkvist_05.jpg

All images © Douglas Ljunkvist


Adam_Krause_MarketHotel_shot10_pan.jpg


An aCurator favourite, photographer Adam Krause sent in these photos of Brooklyn's Market Hotel and some of its residents.

"The Market Hotel opened in 2008 in Bushwick Brooklyn as a venue for punk rock shows and loft style living for about a dozen. Both activities being done illegally due to a lack of permits and incorrect zoning. The owner recently decided to make it a legal venue and continue to play punk rock shows, but in order to get the building to code, its current residents must move out. These are portraits and interiors of the residents during the final days of the Market Hotel." 

Thanks Adam! I love the collages!




Adam_Krause_MarketHotel_shot25_pan.jpg

Adam_Krause_MarketHotel_shot1_0048.jpg

Adam_Krause_MarketHotel_shot4_0269.jpg


All images © Adam Krause

David_Chancellor_00031010.jpg

Xhosa huntsman with lynx # I, South Africa © David Chancellor/INSTITUTE

Elyse Weingarten reviews the extremely impressive book Hunters, a photographic essay by David Chancellor (text by Bill Kouwenhoven. Published by the good people at Schilt, March 2013)

"If I am rabid, I am equal to what is outside." Paula Fox, Desperate Characters.



Photographer David Chancellor's book, Hunters, explores the psychology of the hunter, documenting the safaris that comprise the big game trophy industry in southern Africa. The book is divided into two parts, the first containing over a hundred full-page photographs set deep in the African wildlife; among them, portraits of hunters and huntresses posing with their prey, in the instant after the kill. It is this exigent moment - and the hope for what it could reveal - that propelled Chancellor to join hunting safaris with seasoned, lifelong hunters throughout his adopted country of South Africa, and Namibia and Zimbabwe. Each kill is a "trophy," and the rarer the species, the better. 

David_Chancellor_00031006.jpg

Bow hunters in blind, Eastern Cape, South Africa

The question this book begs is "why?" Why have these hunters come all the way from their home countries to hunt animals they know to be dangerous and endangered, and come back again and again? It seems that the rush of the kill is what is being sold. The ultimate freedom is to kill, and with a hunting license, death becomes the ultimate commodity. The absence of blood on the photographed hunters, except for the occasional shirt or the ceremoniously blood-smeared face, is conspicuous. In this very lucrative business, death is sanitized.  

The second part of the book contains the breathtaking photo narrative, "Elephant Story," taken near a national park in Zimbabwe. Here, the thrill of big game hunting is replaced by the consumption of game meat by a local population. The twelve photographs of this series sequentially show villagers descend upon a dead elephant and skin it, collecting the flesh for meat until all that is left are skeletal remains and bloody chunks of unusable innards. In contrast to the hunters who visit and use the gaming industry as a spiritual or aesthetic gain, those who crowd around the elephant's body are just another part of the sustainability of the natural environment. They do not shy from the blood of the animal. Here, in this landscape, death is not tidy. -  Elyse Weingarten

David_Chancellor_00031028.jpg

Huntress, skinners and a nyala, Eastern Cape, South Africa

David_Chancellor_00031021.jpg

Hunter and wife, game farm, Eastern Cape, South Africa

David_Chancellor_00031004.jpg

Huntress with impala, Eastern Cape, South Africa

David_Chancellor_00031009.jpg

Novice hunter with cell phone and blesbok, Eastern Cape, South Africa

David_Chancellor_00031033.jpg

Novice hunter with recovered bullet, Bray, Northern Cape, South Africa

David_Chancellor_00031014.jpg

Huntress with buck, South Africa. Winner of the Taylor Wessing portrait prize 2010, National Portrait Gallery, London

David_Chancellor_00031058.jpg

Fallen giraffe, Somerset East, Eastern Cape, South Africa

David_Chancellor_00031073.jpg

Elephant detail # II, Zimbabwe

All images © David Chancellor/INSTITUTE

David Chancellor, born in London, England, works and lives in South Africa. Many thanks go to David, to his agency INSTITUTE and to Schilt Publishing.

Rita_Rivera_29.PitcherandballF.Rodriquez.jpg

Felix Rodriquez, San Francisco Giants © Rita Rivera

'Speak English! The Rise of Latinos in Baseball' (Kent State University Press. Text by Rafael Hermoso) is a new book featuring images by Rita Rivera. Rita was introduced to me by my friend and colleague Mary Engel whose mum, Ruth Orkin, Rita used to assist. Mary works hard to maintain the archive of both her parents - her dad was Morris Engel - and I'm thrilled she hooked me up with Rita and introduced me to this project about the important role Latinos increasingly play in league baseball and the prejudice they still face. 

Rita_Rivera_MannyRamirez.jpg

Manny Ramirez, Boston Red Sox

Here's the blurb for you baseball fans.

"'Speak English! The Rise of Latinos in Baseball chronicles how much - and how little - has changed since the first Latino played in the big leagues in the nineteenth century. By the middle of the next century, the Alous, Vic Power, and Rico Carty worked to earn their place in the game amid taunts and ridicule. Today, even established players and stars may be told to speak English in clubhouses, eliciting cringes or shrugs from individuals who are seemingly still hurting."

Rita_Rivera_34.VicPower.jpg

Vic Power

"Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig offers a foreword full of nostalgia and pride. The afterword by Omar Minaya describes his experience playing ball in Queens and being the first Hispanic general manager in baseball. Speak English! selects the stories of 45 players to illustrate the collective history of Latinos in baseball and is illustrated with photographic portraits of many of them."

Rita_Rivera_brothers.jpg

Wilton and Vladimir Guerrero

"Today, more than a quarter of all major leaguers are Latino, and most began as outsiders. Globalization unearthed baseball in San Pedro de Macoris, Caguas, and Maracay. American teams looked abroad for talent and cheap wages, carving baseball diamonds out of sugarcane fields. Players in their teens left their families. Those from Cuba knew they were possibly leaving for the rest of their lives, just for the chance to play in a country still struggling with diversity in the 1950s and 1960s.

Yet many Latino players still speak as if not much has changed. Far from perfect, their no-rules journey to professional contracts has increased the risk of taking improper shortcuts. Several players were implicated recently in the use of steroids and performance-enhancing drugs. Others admitted to shaving years off their ages, allowing them to compete with an advantage against younger players."

Rita_Rivera_E.Figueroa.jpg

Ed Figueroa, The Yankees

"The great Latino story is also one of glory, as some of the best players in major league history tell of their hard voyage to baseball's mainland. The tale is likewise one of realists, and readers will not find anything in these stories that does not exist in other walks of life. The story is not clean, but it is compelling. Like baseball, there's enough to love in it to keep coming back to it as generations learn from the ups and downs of the Latino role in baseball, and its rightful place in history."


Felipe Alou, San Francisco Giants

Rita_Rivera_2.AlbertPujols.jpg

Albert Pujols, St.Louis Cardinals

Rita_Rivera_LuisTiant.jpg

Luis Tiant played with Boston Red Sox

All images © Rita Rivera

Recent Entries

Categories

Links