Nick Brandreth is a freelance photographer in New Jersey. He studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology, whose graduating class I used to welcome to my photo agency each year, prior to my departure in 2006. I was always impressed with the work and the well-rounded skills they learned from top profs Dennis Defibaugh and Doug Manchee. Nick is a contributor to various publications including the Wall Street Journal. He has a self-portrait in the About section of his website, something I live in hope for.




All images © Nick Brandreth


Anna Moller is a New York-based photographer whose images are here to cheer me up after a long week, reminding me how difficult muted simplicity is to achieve. Happy Friday! 



Dylan Coulter's ongoing project 'In The Nineties' was inspired by a photograph he made of his grandfather, age 91. His project is evolving into "an exploration of aging which I find fascinating, particularly since people are living longer in increasingly vital ways."

Nathelle Greenleaf, 95



Thelma Poitras, 91



Ace Coulter, 91

Gerda Frankel, 96

Toby Wujciak, 92

All images © Dylan Coulter


For many New Yorkers, summer isn't summer without a visit to Fire Island, a narrow 30 mile long  stretch of glorious beaches with a mixture of communities organized into hamlets. The Fire Island Invasion, now in its 35th year, is a July 4th event that retells the story of how a drag queen from Cherry Grove, upon being denied service at a bar in the Pines organized a bunch of other queens for an 'invasion'. Zeren Badar took the ferry over this year and recorded some of the fun and games.




All images © Zeren Badar


ICP graduate, Barcelona/New York-based photographer and teacher, Lauren Hermele made this noteworthy series whilst on a Fulbright fellowship in Romania last year.

Crit is a village in Transylvania, population 900.

"It took me a few days to get used to the rush hour traffic in Crit. Every morning and evening, the cows and sheep would take over the roads. It was there that I confronted many of the preconceived ideas I had about whether Romania's small agricultural villages were changing since it joined the European Union. For better or worse, I discovered that there was little if no change. Living in Crit is a tightrope walk between extreme beauty and what the locals refer to as "mizerie." Are the villagers prisoners of paradise like one of my colleagues suggested? I'm not sure, but that poignant statement has echoed in my mind louder than I care to admit."

"The majority of the villagers are Roma (Gypsy), but really are just poor Romanians with little in common with the caravan dwelling Roma of popular imagination. Even though Romania joined the European Union in 2007 after being marginalized from Western Europe for so long, little progress has been made. The local schools lack resources and are in poor conditions, alcoholism is prevalent; children start working in the fields and take on adult responsibilities early in life. Malnutrition and illiteracy also weave their way in and out of many households. Like many small villages in rural Romania, within the lyrical chaos and beauty in Crit, there is a structure that is inherently falling apart."


Great stories about Lauren's work on her blog where we find Lauren teaching photography to the kids in Crit.



All images 2010 © Lauren Hermele

Marco_Zecchin_Motorpool.jpgMarco Zecchin's series 'Fort Ord (ret.)' consists of images from the decommissioned Army post near Monterey, California. I'd like to thank him for sharing this story.

"...driving past Fort Ord army base along the Monterey Bay in the late 50's and 60's, I was fascinated by the soldiers moving in convoys, marching in formation, and practicing shooting their rifles along the road we traveled.

In the late '60s and early '70s, approaching draft age, I found this fascination in conflict with my feelings about the Vietnam War and the men who trained there. The protests I witnessed as we drove by... along with the news of the war, confused me. My fascination with the military was confronted with the realities of war.

In the fall of 2005, during an annual reunion of photographic friends of Morley Baer's in Monterey, some of us wandered onto the now decommissioned Fort Ord army base. Walking around the base, my youthful fascination and the stories of military duty and war shared with me by my veteran friends, opened me to the energy of this place: the energy of men training and preparing for war lingers in these barracks."





All images © Marco Zecchin


The intro: "aCurator is dope!"


The web bio: "Dayv Mattt was born in Toronto on April 28th, 1977. He is addicted to cursing, simple white dress shirts, and shooting street photography. Dayv is very handsome and currently lives in Seoul with his equally gorgeous wife. They are both ultra-wicked-awesome. There is nothing poignant Dayv wants to say about this photography."


The artist's statement: "What I capture is the essence of Seoul, and many Koreans don't like my photography because they feel that it's too dark, negative, and somber. This is in direct contrast with people outside Korea who have said that my photography of Seoul displays a dynamic and interesting city they never knew existed. Opinions aside, I love shooting street, and will continue doing so regardless of whether I am published, noticed, or respected." 

Well, Dayv, aCurator gladly noticed, published and respects you.  


All images © Dayv Mattt


Megan Kathleen McIssac's images are timeless, her writing is unassuming, and her website is good fun. "throughout everything that has happened, i genuinely consider myself lucky and i'm not sure what else to say about it. i discovered a passion for making photographs when i was seven or eight years old and i continue to make ends meet so that i can support my travels and photography and truly live. being stubborn, i only like to shoot film and torture myself by carrying around my heavy mamiya c330 wherever i go, often by foot. currently i'm working on self publishing my first photo-book while contemplating where and how id like to travel to next."




When Manjari told me about this project I was really moved. She talked of the many trips she took with her family to visit Hindu temples and the ubiquitousness of imagery of deities in India, and that when she relocated to the States, art galleries and museums became her pilgrimages.

As commonplace as paintings and sculptures of Hindu deities are, there are no photographs. Manjari intends to change this by creating a series of photographs of specific gods and godesses, with every detail included, created from scratch. Just take a look at what she achieved for Maa Laxmi. Manjari's Kickstarter campaign is already 25% fulfilled; there are plenty of rewards available so why not consider helping to fund this project and we can all go see the enormous results in a gallery near us soon!

Maa Laxmi © Manjari Sharma


"I thought that if I was gay, I couldn't have kids." El Segundo, 2009.

Another important series, this from Stefan Jora: "The Gay Families Project". Stefan is hoping to expand the project to Washington State. If you're feeling fundy, you can easily support the project here. Benefits start at only $1.


Leaving for work. El Segundo, 2009.

"The Project has as an objective the creation of a photobook featuring American families with parents who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer. Informed by the past, while drawing from the present, and looking to the future, the book has the potential for creating awareness about the commonality of such 'gay families', especially for viewers in parts of the world where ill-informed homophobia is prevalent. Thematically, I am interested in exploring the intersection of the mythical, homosexual, and political in American culture, and am aiming for a book that will contribute to the discourse on what constitutes the proverbial American Dream in the 21st century.

I have been working on this project for close to two years, and have thus far met with and photographed over twenty families in California. With your support, I plan to photograph families living in Washington state this summer, which will give me a better idea as to whether I need to expand the Project to other U.S. states in the future, or continue and complete it in the Golden State alone.


 In bed with the egg donor. San Mateo, 2010


HIV-positive parents. San Francisco, 2010


Heading to the playground. Mill Valley, 2010

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