Photographers


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As a reaction to Guiliani whitewashing Times Square and cleaning up NYC nightlife, Neo-Burlesque emerged as a force. My client Leland Bobbé has been photographing the performers and is working on a book about them. 

Leland knows how to capture a personality in a single frame and this skill works so well with his burlesque photographs. There are other photographers working on burlesque projects, but personally, I find Leland's work more tasteful, engaging and empowering than either Henry Horenstein (may I never see that fishnetted backside close-up ever again), and Miami Celebrity Photographer Brian Smith. 

Dirty Martini © Leland Bobbé





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Jonny Porkpie © Leland Bobbé

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Manjari Sharma's Shower Series was probably the most talked about by the reviewers at the end of ASMP's fine art portfolio review in May. Her bathroom confessionals really stood out and Manjari spoke about the personal project with true passion, being amazed herself at how her subjects had let go once the water hit them.

"Secretly I have been told by my subjects that it is thrilling and adventuresome to be in my shower; Secretly cheating my traditional and tame Indian upbringing I live through all of my subjects; Fighting their wars and braving their fears for those few hours where we are connected through this pious space."

Fast forward just a few short weeks and not only has she received a lot of press, she won a commission to shoot an ad campaign for Grohe.

"Custom showers were built in a studio and a series inspired by my personal project was recreated in New Delhi. Ten Indian models were selected for the shoot and the result is currently being used on billboards in several cities in India."

So there you have it: follow your passion, shoot what you love, devote time to personal projects and then present them eloquently, to as many people as possible.

See behind the scenes on Manjari's blog

From the original 'Shower Series' © Manjari Sharma

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In Dirk's blog, The Heavy Light, he gives us the opportunity to learn a lot of interesting things about who he shoots, how he shoots and indeed why he shoots!

He sent me a printed magazine of 'The Sultans' a little while ago, and has just written up the back story on how some images taken in India led to his project on older Turkish men. Make some tea and check out parts 1 and 2.

From 'The Sultans' © Dirk Anschütz



A slideshow of some of Michael Putland's best Clash photographs.

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Afterlife 2 © Michael Massaia

Baron Wolman recently introduced me to the work of Michael Massaia, a young, New York-based photographer who uses a large format view camera and makes his own platinum/palladium prints. He describes the images as "one shot" candid scenes that have been pushed to their limit via film developing and printing techniques. Should you find yourself in Texas, Michael has a solo show of his platinums opening on June 12th at Afterimage Gallery in Dallas. He is also represented by Gallery Two Seventy in NJ.

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Afterlife 1 © Michael Massaia

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Deep in a Dream 1 © Michael Massaia

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Deep in a Dream 2 © Michael Massaia


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The family of Wynn Bullock announces a new website dedicated to the great man with work spanning four decades, and a traveling exhibition 'Wynn Bullock's Color Light Abstractions' is on now through June 26th at the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, CA.

Typewriter, 1951 © Wynn Bullock

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After Out Magazine saw M. Sharkey's feature 'Queer Kids' published in aCurator magazine, Sharkey got a call asking if they too could publish the images. Then I got a call from the Big Issue, London's magazine that supports the homeless, asking the same thing. He told me yesterday over a delicious home-made lunch that the Advocate also picked it up. And then he told me to pick out a print! (I chose the fabulous Brandon) Thank you dear!

The 'Queer Kids' project is a work-in-progress. For information about supporting its continuation contact the photographer via his website.

Brandon © M. Sharkey

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Lynn Goldsmith has been a constant in my life for almost 20 years: a massively prolific, legendary photographer, she's pals with my business partner Michael Putland and was running her photo agency in New York while I ran Retna, until she did the prescient thing and got out of that industry in the late 90s. We haven't laid eyes on each other since we don't know when, so imagine my surprise to look up from a reviewing table this week to see her beaming face. Splitting her time between Colorado and New York, Lynn is working on a book of her self-portrait series 'Looking Glass'.

In honor of the official start of summer here in New York, here's Carly Simon at Martha's Vineyard, 1981.

Carly Simon © Lynn Goldsmith

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Rapper King Kaiow

Max Colson is a London-based "digital photographer with an eye on photojournalism". He submitted some work and we began an email exchange about his use of stills within video, his attitudes towards documentary photography, the weather (we are both British after all!) and since he had submitted an eloquent artist statement, we decided he should tell his story.

"I began making serious attempts at documentary photo projects at the tail end of 2008, so it's safe to say that I am an incredibly young photographer. Over 2009 I gained more experience documenting not only the participants of the UK's full contact fighting scene, but also the rappers involved in London's underground rap scene [in two separate projects]; by the end of the year I felt that I taken my two projects as far as they could go. I was completely wrong.

Although I was not quite conscious of it at the time, my aim was largely to go in and take 'great pictures' in quite a show and tell fashion. More than anything else, I took photos in order for people to understand that I was a photographer, and that I had the so-called 'eye'. Looking back on these photos now I can see that perhaps it was my personal quest for the dramatic which was often the overriding factor in my work.

I think the reasons behind why people take documentary photographs is an incredibly important area in photojournalism today. I speculate that the influence of commerce conflicts with representing things as they really are and I think that the demands of commercial news creates a tension in any profession which has appointed itself as a recorder of history. I am currently producing a video which deals with this topic, and uses my images."

For more on Max, visit his website. I learned something new on his blog.

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All images from RAW: The London Rap Scene © Max Colson


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© Ryan Donnell

Here in NYC on polling day, lucky kids get to stay home and the grown-ups go to their schools to vote. But in Philadelphia all sorts of establishments are temporarily repurposed for the electorate. Ryan Donnell has been photographing these locations for the last couple of years, and is out in the rain today for the primaries. Visit the Philadelphia Polling Place Project to see lots more.

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All images © Ryan Donnell

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