Exhibitions


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Aerated Bread Company, 1981 © David Bailey

A newly curated series of David Bailey's quiet photos of the NW1 area of London taken in the early 80s is available in a gorgeously printed, small but perfectly formed, limited edition book from HENI Publishing in London. Cop a load of the blacks in these images and then, if you can, go see the prints which are on show through the end of January at HENI's gallery space, 6 - 10 Lexington Street, in the heart of London's Soho. 

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St. Pancras Station from Euston Road, 1981 © David Bailey

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Primrose Hill, 1981 © David Bailey

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440 Buck Street, 1982 © David Bailey

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Buy your signed, limited edition copy of NW1 from HENI. Thanks and props to Mark Best of Blah PR

And for my American friends who have never seen this - enjoy!

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The "Ruffle a Summer Soire" dress, à la kale. Tea-length, naturally. Accents include turmeric and quinoa belt, 
lime, and turmeric shades, and tomato and red quinoa corset heels to elevate the overall presentation.

Images © Evelina Reinhart

A fabulous new project from Evelina Reinhart, a photographer whose work with food brought us The Joy of Eating, a photo series-turned-book about food for acid reflux sufferers that she made as her thesis project at SVA. Next up is 'Our Appetite for Trends.'

"They come and go as quickly as the next runway show. Technically, perhaps, they're comestibles, but what we're devouring are trends. If it's not in Vogue it's not going into our mouths."

Read all the color stories over at Evy's website, and see prints this week at Gallery 128, as part of The Fun Food Show, opening December 1st, 2016. Private reception, December 9th, 2016, 6-9pm. 128 Rivington Street, NYC.

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Evy tells me it took about 30 hours to create one image. She's a fantastic food stylist. "The canvas was large, 30 x 35 inches, and it was filled with real food and then photographed." 
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 Cherry Lips © Pacifico Silano

 Contributing editor to this blog Efrem Zelony-Mindell is not only a great writer, and artist, he is also a great curator. Never doing anything by half, Efrem put together a fascinating group show that is running now through September 23, 2016 at the Rubber Factory down on New York's lower east side - 29 Ludlow to be precise.

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Untitled © Izaac Encisco

I credit Efrem for keeping me on my toes and making sure I don't get too comfy in my taste. There is such a variety of works here that the show feels huge but is in fact small and easily consumable. You can read a proper sensible interview on Humble Arts between Efrem and Stephen Frailey, head of SVA's photography program and founder of Dear Dave magazine, which is concurrently featuring the images from this show. 

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Marital Troubles © Ilana Savdie

The full list of exhibited artists is: Thomas Albdorf, Ellen Carey, Alli Coates, Joy Drury Cox, Dillon Dewaters, Izaac Enciso, Aaron Hegert, Nico Krijno, Namsa Leuba, Ryan Oskin, Signe Pierce, Ilana Savdie, Pacifico Silano, and Quinn Torrens.

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Untitled II, from the series "The African Queens" © Namsa Leuba

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A man holds a pro-vegetarian poster amongst the crowd, Woodstock Festival, August 1969 © Baron Wolman/ Iconic Images

You bought the book, now go see a new exhibition! "Woodstock by Baron Wolman" is at Proud Gallery in Camden, London, from July 28 to September 11, 2016. 

You can join us on opening night when you share this blog post and comment on my Facebook and Twitter, or Proud's. Just mention aCurator. See you there! 
#flares

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Crowd lying on the grass, August 1969 © Baron Wolman/ Iconic Images

Read about Baron's experiences photographing the crowds as well as the bands at Woodstock in The Guardian. "People had no idea what they were buying a ticket for. Now you know - you go to Glastonbury, and everything is planned, no question. The barriers, the tickets, everything that's typical of big modern festivals. At Woodstock, nobody knew how to plan a festival of this size, so things evolved organically. I saw it happening and it was magic... There was a spirit in the air, man. There was a spirit that was communicated, without stating it, that this thing was to be peaceful."


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Untitled, 2014 © Judith StennekenGalerie 5, 6


The last visit I made to AIPAD - in 2008 - was the first and last time I attended. I left that first time and didn't make a photograph for four years. 

Upon hitting the Armory floor that year I quickly took note of the many Minor Whites, Aaron Siskinds, and Harry Callahans there were on the floors leaning up against the walls of booths. I risked picking up a framed Minor White in a booth in which I felt particularly invisible. No one seemed to notice the 20-year-old cretin picking up and waving around the framed image. "That's how it's gonna be huh?" I thought to myself. 

I came around a corner to a well-established contemporary photography booth; a gallery, which will remain nameless, with a featured image of an artist, who will also remain nameless. The print was bigger than me; I'm six foot four. Shot, framed, and lit with the utmost perfection. The subject of this photo is something one would find at a local zoo. What you can't find at your local zoo is the best photography equipment and the most expensive flashes money can buy, which the photographer clearly used to achieve the photograph. Needless to say the creature's photographic impression was something to behold, every inch an idealized image of absolute perfection. "How could anyone, who doesn't want to make images like this but does want to work in this field, compete with something like this object?" was my bone-crushing thought.

And that's how I left my feelings for photography. For four years.

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I didn't know then what I realize now. The Armory's AIPAD is as much an antiques road show as it is the Fine Art Photography world's Comic Con. It's a chance for photo galleries and institutions, and people, from all over the world to gather in New York City. There's some good quick sales to be made and, if you take the time, a few new friends to make as well. With the right intentions and a good pair of eyes, it's not totally impossible to yield some meaningful experiences with the people and large display of very concisely and purposefully curated photos. After all there are some exquisite images.

So this time I decided I wanted to turn the experience around on itself. I spent over seven hours every day this year at AIPAD. I'd like to point out that doing this doesn't make me special - just stupid, crazy, and driven enough. The heroes of AIPAD are the gallerists, assistants, and Armory staff who dedicate their time, energy, and maybe even souls to this convention. I tip my hat to them. 

Their passion inspired me to play some part, so I kept a stream of conscious diary during and after everyday.

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Jack Ruby Shoots Lee Harvey Oswald © Bob Jackson, Gary Edwards Gallery

Opening Night:
Opening night is like chasing around after some semblance of cordiality and imagery. It's more social than photographic but the evening is hugely photogenic. Name tags and introductions, stumbling over hors d'oeuvres. It's great to sift through the confusion and endless stream of booze.

"Where on earth do they put all those empty glasses?" I wondered on my way out.

Day 1:
Standardized words flush the halls of the Armory - words like fresh and contemporary. There are things in those silly haphazard bins with far too many zeros. Like the Robert Frank I found for $80,000 with only a simple matting and plastic sleeve for protection. 

"You're not going to forget me," someone brightly beams at a gallery owner, "my last name's Art." There are joyous little words of amusement muttered by many different patrons. When you catch one it's like finding a diamond. "You're a craftsman! And I mean that in the best way I can mean that!" Such passion. It's hard not to laugh out loud. 

Rest becomes a commodity on the well-placed benches. The tax is worth the spectacle of the company of strangers and friends alike.

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Vandalism Series, 1974 © John DivolaLee Gallery

Day 2:
By now things seem much more solid. You're even starting to memorize where things are. Close your eyes and you can remember exact locations of your favorite images even though your head does nothing but spin from the sheer volume. There's no more casual strolling and looking; you can actually see the photos on the walls. This is no longer a convention, it's an endurance trial.

Day 3:
[I've written one word here. It's the same word I've written for day four.]
Gossip. 

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Dings & Shadows, 2013 © Ellen CareyM+B

The whole thing becomes too much and I certainly have to admit it may be because of the degree of my visits, but not totally the fault of my obsession. AIPAD is a lot of work! As a casual goer it's great to stroll through and give the time it deserves. Talk to people - there's no reason not to - they're surprisingly friendly, intelligent, and engaging. (Many attendees are actual working professionals; make friends, but don't ask for favors!) Maybe all that is actually not so surprising. After all, we're all at AIPAD for the same reason; we really feel passionately towards photography. Given my first interaction with AIPAD and this recent experience, I've come to realize in many ways that this crazy experience is what you make of it. If you let it put you on your ass it will. It's much more rewarding to make it yours. For me, I gave myself over to it. I'm eager to get back behind my camera.

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Barak Obama, The White House, Washington D.C., 2010 © Mark SeligerSteven Kasher Gallery

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Place (Series) #125, 2009 © Bill Jacobson, Julie Saul Gallery

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Chongqing I, Chongqing Municipality, 2006 © Nadav KanderFlowers Gallery

Editor's note: AIPAD will relocate next year from the Park Avenue Armory to the Piers. 

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You've got to love a public installation! Emma Blau's Face Forward exhibition, on now in London, England, is an installation of supersize prints of locals with whom Emma collaborated to make these fabulous portraits.

"Face Forward is a public art exhibition created by award-winning photographic artist Emma Blau that utilises building site hoardings in the Church Street area of Westminster, which is currently undergoing regeneration. A resident herself, Blau's large-scale photographic portraits feature local people who will be affected by the huge transformations taking place in their neighbourhood. Face Forward is on display throughout 2016."


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The issue of gentrification is being addressed in photography quite extensively at the moment but Emma's project elevates the issue with its impressive installation. Not an easy challenge to host an exhibition in the streets - imagine the logistics!! Check out the installation photos.  

Emma will lead a tour of all three streets on April 27th, 2016. Head over to the official Facebook page for details.
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All images © Emma Blau / Face Forward

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Gohar Dashti, Untitled #5, from the series "Today's Life and War," 2008, Chromogenic print, 27 5/8 x 41 3/8 in.; 
Courtesy of the artist, Azita Bina, and Robert Klein Gallery, Boston; © Gohar Dashti

She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World opens at the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) in Washington, DC, on April 8, 2016, with an opening reception on the 7th, and runs through July 31, 2016.  The exhibition "challenges stereotypes surrounding the people, landscapes, and cultures of the region, and provides insight into political and social issues. The exhibition presents more than 80 photographs and a video installation. These provocative works - most created within the last decade - range in genre from portraiture, to documentary, to staged narratives." 

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Gohar Dashti, Untitled #1, from the series "Today's Life and War," 2008, Chromogenic print, 27 5/8 x 41 3/8 in.; 
Courtesy of the artist, Azita Bina, and Robert Klein Gallery, Boston; © Gohar Dashti

"The title of the exhibition is inspired by the Arabic word rawiya, which means "she who tells a story." It is also the name of a collective of women photographers based in the Middle East founded in 2009. Women worldwide have been pioneers in the mediums of photography and video since their inception. This exhibition demonstrates that the work of women photographers continues to resonate on a global scale."

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Rania Matar, Stephanie, Beirut, Lebanon, from the series "A Girl and Her Room," 2010; Pigment print, 36 x 50 in.; 
Courtesy of the artist and Carroll and Sons, Boston; © Rania Matar 

"Each artist in She Who Tells a Story offers a vision of the world she has witnessed. The photographers' images invite viewers to reconsider their own preconceptions about the nature of politics, family, and personal identity in the Middle East." 

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Rania Matar, Reem, Doha, Lebanon, from the series "A Girl and Her Room," 2010; Pigment print, 36 x 50 in.; 
Courtesy of the artist and Carroll and Sons, Boston; © Rania Matar 

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Newsha Tavakolian, Untitled, from the series "Listen," 2010; Pigment print, 39 3/8 x 47 1/4 in.; 
Courtesy of the artist and East Wing Contemporary Gallery

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Nermine Hammam, The Break, from the series "Cairo Year One: Upekkha," 2011; Chromogenic print, 23 5/8 x 23 5/8 in.; 
Courtesy of Taymour Grahne

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Shadi Ghadirian, Untitled, from the series "Qajar," 1998, Gelatin silver print, 15 3/4 x 11 7/8 in.; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum purchase with the Horace W. Goldsmith Fund for Photography and Abbott Lawrence Fund, 2013.571;
© Shadi Ghadirian; Photo © 2015 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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Boushra Almutawakel, Untitled, from the series "The Hijab," 2001; 
Chromogenic print, 47 1/4 x 39 3/8 in.; Courtesy of the artist and the Howard Greenberg Gallery

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Lalla Essaydi, Bullets Revisited #3, 2012; Triptych, chromogenic prints on aluminum, 150 x 66 in.; 
Courtesy of the artist, Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston, and Edwynn Houk Gallery, NYC

Our friends at the MFA Boston organized this exhibition in 2013, and Mrs. Karsh gave the introduction for Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan.

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Robert Mapplethorpe, American, 1946-1989
Identical self-portraits of Robert Mapplethorpe with trip cable in hand, 1974
Gelatin silver print. Sheet (each): 9.3 x 11.6 cm (3 11/16 x 4 9/16 in.)
Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Held at the Getty Research Institute, 2011.M.20.24
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

The first photography exhibition I ever saw was Robert Mapplethorpe, in London, and I have always said it ruined me for life. In my memory the exhibition was at the Festival Hall, but the web won't support this and insists it was the National Portrait Gallery, 'The Perfect Moment' retrospective, 1988/89. Regardless, I remember staring endlessly at one of his highly sexual portraits and listening to the outrage of the person viewing next to me. I felt happy. 

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Ajitto, 1981
Gelatin silver print. Image: 45.4 x 35.5 cm (17 7/8 x 14 in.)
Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation, 2011.7.13
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

That Mapplethorpe-related happiness has carried me through my journey in the world of photography so I was beyond thrilled when a review copy of Robert Mapplethorpe: The Photographs (J. Paul Getty Museum, March 2016) arrived. What a book! 

Mapplethorpe's most recognizable and less-known images, both the graphic and the gorgeous, are drawn from the J. Paul Getty Museum's own collection, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, and Mapplethorpe Archive housed at the Getty Research Institute. 

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Grapes, 1985
Gelatin silver print. Image: 38.5 x 38 cm (15 3/16 x 14 15/16 in.)
Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation, 2011.7.20
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Thomas, 1987
Gelatin silver print. Image: 48.8 x 48.8 cm (19 3/16 x 19 3/16 in.)
Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation, 2011.7.31
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

"This publication is issued on the occasion of the exhibition Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Medium on view at both the  J. Paul Getty Museum and at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from March 15 and March 20, respectively, through July 31, 2016; at the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Montreal from September 10, 2016, through January 15, 2017; and at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, from October 28, 2017, through February 4, 2018."

Let it be known that the young me spent not inconsiderable time wondering if she could scrape together the £1,500 that a print was going for back then. They say one only regrets the things one did not do... But then, how would I have chosen?

Get your copy of Robert Mapplethorpe: The Photographs for under $60. Money well spent for a lifetime of Mapplethorpe mastery.

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Calla Lily, 1988
Gelatin silver print. Image: 49 x 49 cm (19 5/16 x 19 5/16 in.)
Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; partial gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation; partial purchase with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation, 2011.9.26
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Derrick Cross, 1983
Gelatin silver print. Image: 48.5 x 38.2 cm (19 1/8 x 15 1/16 in.)
Promised Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, L.2012.88.910
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Flower Arrangement, 1986 
Gelatin silver print. Image: 49 x 49 cm (19 5/16 x 19 5/16 in.)
Promised Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, L.2012.89.566
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Self-Portrait, 1980
Gelatin silver print. Image: 35.6 x 35.6 cm (14 x 14 in.)
Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; partial gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation; partial purchase with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation, 2011.9.21
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

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Robert Mapplethorpe
Self-Portrait, 1985
Gelatin silver print. Image: 38.7 x 38.6 cm (15 1/4 x 15 3/16 in.)
Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation, 2011.7.21
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

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Chris Killip
From the series In Flagrante Two
Two girls, Grangetown, Middlesbrough, Teeside, 1975
Gelatin Silver Print
© Chris Killip, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Last month, I was talking to a photographer I admire enormously and he told me had just seen one the best photographs of his life, at Yossi Milo here in NYC. It turned out to be the above 'Two Girls' by Chris Killip, whose photos I have much admired after embarrassingly only discovering him rather late in life. The exhibition was ending the following day so I bunked off work for the afternoon and headed to Chelsea.

Yossi Milo Gallery's presentation of fifty gelatin silver prints from the photographs that constituted his book 'In Flagrante' (Secker & Warburg, 1988) hand-printed by Killip, is the first time since 1988 that the series has been exhibited in its entirety and the first time ever in the United States. The images are culturally familiar and endearing to me and it was interesting to talk to some of the American viewers about the miners' strike and the Queen's silver jubilee street parties I remember so well. 

The unassuming photographer has been working at Harvard as professor of visual and environmental studies for many years and apparently will soon retire and cease printing his negatives. So if you're thinking about purchasing a print, now is the time to do it. 

Yossi Milo is pleased to announce that the J. Paul Getty Museum now owns a set of all 50 of Killip's prints and will mount an exhibition in the coming months. The book, In Flagrante Two, is out now from Steidl.


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Puerto Rican Day Parade © Arlene Gottfried, courtesy Daniel Cooney Fine Art

"It takes a lifetime to be a new discovery, I guess." So said Ms Arlene Gottfried this week (speaking to David Schonauer over at AI-AP) in the run-up to her second solo show, 'Bacalaitos & Fireworks', at Daniel Cooney Fine Art, in Chelsea, New York, which opened March 3, 2016 and runs till April 16th. 

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The show at Cooney features images originally collected in Arlene's 2011 book Bacalaitos & Fireworks, printed from her rich, orangey Cibachromes.

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From the press release "Growing up, Gottfried was fascinated with the culture around her, learning to Salsa dance and to love the music, food and language. As an adult living in Manhattan she embraced the Puerto Rican community and they embraced her, sharing their lives with her and her camera. Gottfried says, "From my window on the Lower East Side I could look out and see the Puerto Rican culture I encountered over 30 years earlier. "One night I heard a street vendor on the corner of Avenue C and East 3rd Street calling, "bacalaitos and fireworks", bacalaitos, a fried cod fish indigenous to Puerto Rico and fireworks, for the Fourth of July weekend. This juxtaposition became etched in my mind - representative of an immigrant population on the streets of America."

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These are but a small sample of the colour prints on show. Run don't walk! 

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All images © Arlene Gottfried courtesy Daniel Cooney Fine Art

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