Ice house, Minnesota border with Canada © Laura Migliorino

Minnesota-based photographer and professor Laura Migliorino was fascinated by ice houses as a kid. She had a rather skewed sense of what they were for, but they are in fact used as a base for people ice fishing on the lakes in winter. They look pretty spooky to me!




A bonus further to Jill's feature on the Hirjas, I am just blown away by this. See the stills and more on Jill Peters' website.


Etiología © Guillermo De Angelis

Diegesis is a gorgeous series of abstract images from mysterious artist Guillermo De Angelis.

Diegesis is a style of fiction storytelling which presents an interior view of a world and is
that world itself experienced by the characters in situations and events of the narrative.

"After doing architecture, design and philosophy I dove into photography. With the sort of enthusiasm that drives you to move forward, or better still, inwards. Hoping to discover within, rather than outside myself, what I am trying to show. I choose to take pictures not prepared. I try to get the expression through the economy of resources. Focusing on the details that strike me as essential. Suggesting clearly, presenting without describing."




Delay IV


La soledad




Delay III
All images © Guillermo De Angelis


Nelson Mandela Mouse © Christine Anderson

T'was a long hard winter on the east coast of the USA for all flora and fauna. Christine Anderson tells a tale of two mice and their attempts to escape their captors in New Jersey. 


Of course, Christine was in fact having a laugh, as she rescued and ultimately adopted the tiny buggers. A woman after my own heart. 




All images © Christine Anderson


"Very First Accident" © Zeren Badar

There were so many images that I loved but was unable to include in the final eight for The Center for Photography in Woodstock's 'Photography Now!' exhibition this year. I had published Zeren Badar a couple of years ago here in the blog - I absolutely adore his Fire Island Invasion series. I really love these whacky still life images, too. Here's his spiel:

"I'm hugely influenced by dadaism and neo-dadaism for this photography project. I explore a peculiar combination of photography, painting & collage. I create three dimensional collages with found objects, food and cheaply printed old paintings. I turn pre-existing works of art into Duchampian ready-mades and take photographs of them."



"Lady Gaga"




"Endless Love"
All images © Zeren Badar


Michael Bach is a photographer who enjoys modeling for other artists. But Michael has suffered a plethora of serious health issues during his lifetime and as the effects of multiple disorders increases, he has found this posing becoming increasingly challenging. To help process that, he made a series of self-portraits, saying: "I became intrigued with the idea of photographing myself in this process of decay, both on a personal level and displayed on the modeling stand in a predetermined pose and time interval." Michael tries to maintain half-hour exposures to capture all his tics.

I see strength in his photos,and ownership of his situation, and admirable braveness!




All images © Michael Bach


old_pope. Image by Alessandro Falco

I'm wary of camera-in-front-of-Google-maps projects but I always have time for people whose work I've published in the past, and Alessandro Falco has kept in touch with me since our paths crossed when he entered the International Fine Art Photography Competition a couple of years ago. I think this project is a good one, entertaining. Alessandro is a smart guy, check out his other work.

"Today an experience seems to be truly lived only if with a chance of sharing it in order to obtain approbation, and this is the next step of a consumer society. We are overwhelmed by images, and the internet is the place where this huge amount is left after receiving few or many likes/views/comments. 

"This work aims to present a new socio-cultural trend describing it in a provocative way, showing instead Google earth's photo icons. The main touristic destinations thus become a sort of digital landfill, and it lends to considerations of different nature, including the hypothetical conflict between amateurs and pros, or between tourists and locals."










Something gentle to see you into your weekend, from George Holroyd, a US-born photographer, currently living in Hungary, by way of Paris, France. In his current adopted country, George is working on some new diptychs. I love George's consistently tranquil style. 


"My photography is a form of personal documentary. It is an investigation into those elements that occasionally coalesce in ones awareness to foster a sense of belonging or alienation. I attempt to illustrate these phenomena in my work, presenting images to the viewer that are consistent with my recollection."






All images © George Holroyd

See a previous post with some of George's diaristic earlier work.


I published Walt Stricklin's gorgeous composite panoramas "Made in China" in the magazine almost three years ago now. Walt has stayed prolific in the meantime. Based in Alabama, Walt's been photographing rural churches and composing them thusly:


I love Walt's statement on the series:

"Being the son of a hell fire and brimstone Southern Baptist preacher and growing up in country churches across the South and southwest, this project would seem to be a natural fit. Unfortunately, my father and I never quite saw eye to eye on religion and for the most part, my religious views have not changed or softened. But, rambling through the backroads of the rural south has brought up feelings I had not expected.

I have had a conversion, not religious, more of a societal conversion. I started seeing things with the softer eyes of age. There is something special about rural church buildings. I am starting to understand the strength, comfort and sense of community they bring their congregations. Even the architecture seems to ground the soul in the common sense ways in which they are built. They have the feeling of country grandeur without overwhelming the sensibility of the rural lifestyle."


Here's another photographer I met at PhotoNOLA portfolio reviews. Bruce Morton studied photography, spent a year in the UK as a visiting artist (we did, as one always can, bond over British weather) but he took up landscaping and only returned to photography a few years ago. Bruce's positive personality and open nature is reflected in his imagery. 

His lovely book, 'Forgottonia,' is rich with a local's perspective of an isolated community, and is currently in its third printing. With a foreword by Aline Smithson and editing and book design by Paula Gillen.

Bruce explains:

"[Forgottonia] is actually the nickname for several counties in far west central Illinois. The reason for the nickname started in the 1950s and 1960s when the interstate highway system was being designed and constructed. Many times a route from Chicago to Kansas City, which would run through the heart of this region, was considered but never built. The people in power believed such an area did not need the infrastructure. Education and manufacturing also suffered with lack of funding and promotion. One college closed its doors and moved to Wisconsin. Trains, which moved goods from one small community to another, ceased to operate. Jobs were all related to the farming and cattle business. Many of the graduating seniors from local schools could not wait to leave this forgotten land. I was one of those.

Life has changed here but not necessarily for the better. Young people still hope to leave to find a better future. The overall population has steadily declined and the only jobs are still farm related. Small farmers are succumbing to the larger operations. In 2007 I decided to return to my homeland and photographically document this area that I once considered to be the most boring place on Earth. I am excited to be back with new eyes to hear old stories from long past friends and look forward to the new ones yet to be told. This book of photographs is a story about the life cycle of those who live, love, and die here."






All images © Bruce Morton

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