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In a quite brilliant move, the ICP archives have created a Google map not only of all the locations where Weegee took photographs but including a clip from the newspaper. There is tons of other interesting stuff at ICP's 'Weegee's World' including photos, audio and a searchable database, but this is genius.

"Firemen William Murawski and William Miller went to the rescue of this cat when it wedged itself between the walls of the buildings at 51 and 53 Barclay St.
PM Daily, Oct. 6, 1942, p. 19"

Have fun!
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As a reaction to Guiliani whitewashing Times Square and cleaning up NYC nightlife, Neo-Burlesque emerged as a force. My client Leland Bobbé has been photographing the performers and is working on a book about them. 

Leland knows how to capture a personality in a single frame and this skill works so well with his burlesque photographs. There are other photographers working on burlesque projects, but personally, I find Leland's work more tasteful, engaging and empowering than either Henry Horenstein (may I never see that fishnetted backside close-up ever again), and Miami Celebrity Photographer Brian Smith. 

Dirty Martini © Leland Bobbé





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Jonny Porkpie © Leland Bobbé

Marissa Roth is a wonderful photojournalist and old friend. Quietly and unassumingly she puts herself in front of hard news: a coup in the Philippines, the LA riots, Kosovar Albanian refugees, photographing humanity in her own moving and deeply respectful manner. 

On Friday, July 9th, the Museum of Tolerance in LA will host the exhibition opening for Srebrenica: Then Is Now, Fifteen Years After the Massacre, photographs by Marissa Roth.

July 11, 2010 will mark the 15th anniversary of the 5‐day massacre of over 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and teen‐age boys after the fall of the Srebrenica enclave near the end of the war in the former Yugoslavia. During two extended trips to Bosnia and Hercegovina in 2009, photojournalist Marissa Roth went to Srebrenica Municipality and related areas to meet and photograph a number of women directly affected by the massacre and the war. The exhibition will remain on display through August 3rd.

Burned out homes, Srebrenica municipality © Marissa Roth

Karsh_Vaughn_Williams_02.jpgIn the fall this year the Cantata Singers begin their Ralph Vaughan Williams season in Boston. "Cantata Singers inspires, engages, and challenges listeners through daring juxtapositions of music old and new, compelling programming, and exceptional artistry."

Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1949 © Yousuf Karsh

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"Alberta's tar sands are arguably the world's most destructive energy project in progress today. Being Canada's main economic driver, and a favourite source of 'safe' energy for its big neighbour down south, the tar sands are a hotly contested issue between the provincial and national government, environmental groups and the indigenous people of Canada who by and large are opposed to the breakneck speed of oil industry developments.

Stretching from the town of Fort McMurray northwards and as far as Peace River to the west, the confirmed deposits of bitumen in the ground take up an area the size of England. To date, only three to five per cent of the existing deposits are being mined or extracted, by inserting high-pressure steam into the ground. Turning bitumen into synthetic crude oil is no easy task: it requires vast amounts of energy and water, and the yields have only become viable with an exploding per-barrel oil price. For thousands of years, Alberta's prime resource has lain idle in the ground, oil companies patiently awaiting their turn until prices went rocketing in the last decade. The once sleepy town of Fort McMurray has been turned into the new frontier of the latest gold rush, absorbing the gains and ills that come with it: rapid growth, high prices, a huge influx of workers, crime, drugs and pollution. Walking down the bland main drag of the aptly nicknamed 'Fort McMoney', you can't help but notice that anybody who is anybody in the oil business has set up camp here: Shell, Total, Chevron, Syncrude, Suncor, CNRL, BP, Husky, Statoil and numerous others have bought up leases to extract the black gold from Alberta's land.

This comes at a high cost, both in terms of investment and natural resources as well as to the environment and the people who live there: the divisive issue is one of land rights and health concerns of Canada's First Nations who live downstream from the tar sands. Is Canada to respect aboriginal land rights, as enshrined in their treaty with the Crown over a hundred years ago which grants the First Nations the freedom to hunt, fish and trap according to their ancient ways? Or is it more interested in oil developments with their consequential destruction of the boreal forest, bringing of employment, and ultimately, money?

For many years, the First Nations in northern Alberta have been complaining about grave health concerns and unusually high cancer rates in their communities - a concern apparently not shared by the Province of Alberta. On another level, several First Nations have begun to legally challenge the status quo and the sale of their lands to oil companies. It is a fight that is synonymous of the classic David vs. Goliath: small and mostly poor communities on the one side; big oil, government, and heavyweight lawyers on the other.

One thing is for sure: the future is set to be challenging, and a mighty struggle is looming."
- Jiri Rezac, July 2010
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Get Off My Lawn is a 48-page photo-zine, edited and published by photographer Geoffrey Ellis. The zine features the work of eleven photographers who are 34 years and older*. Get Off My Lawn is a tongue-in-cheek response to the calls for entry, contests and publications that require "emerging photographers" to be somewhere between the ages of 18 and 34.

There are 222 hand numbered copies and each of the 11 photographers has their own cover.

'Waiting' © Jennifer Loeber

*Yousuf Karsh would say, you may have a camera and eyes, but until a certain age, you don't really see.

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Manjari Sharma's Shower Series was probably the most talked about by the reviewers at the end of ASMP's fine art portfolio review in May. Her bathroom confessionals really stood out and Manjari spoke about the personal project with true passion, being amazed herself at how her subjects had let go once the water hit them.

"Secretly I have been told by my subjects that it is thrilling and adventuresome to be in my shower; Secretly cheating my traditional and tame Indian upbringing I live through all of my subjects; Fighting their wars and braving their fears for those few hours where we are connected through this pious space."

Fast forward just a few short weeks and not only has she received a lot of press, she won a commission to shoot an ad campaign for Grohe.

"Custom showers were built in a studio and a series inspired by my personal project was recreated in New Delhi. Ten Indian models were selected for the shoot and the result is currently being used on billboards in several cities in India."

So there you have it: follow your passion, shoot what you love, devote time to personal projects and then present them eloquently, to as many people as possible.

See behind the scenes on Manjari's blog

From the original 'Shower Series' © Manjari Sharma

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From The Guardian: Two journalists in London have received a payout from the Metropolitan Police after the Met admitted failing to respect the freedom of the press during a protest at the Greek embassy in London in 2008. In this disturbing video one cop taunts the photographer like a school kid as he's yanking the guy's camera off his neck, and later they mutter "scum" under their breath.

In letters sent to the journalists, the force said "The [Met] confirms its recognition that freedom of the press is a cornerstone of democracy and that journalists have a right to report freely. [We] recognise that on 8 December 2008 they failed to respect press freedom in respect of Mr Vallée and Mr Parkinson." Both men received £3500 in compensation.

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In Dirk's blog, The Heavy Light, he gives us the opportunity to learn a lot of interesting things about who he shoots, how he shoots and indeed why he shoots!

He sent me a printed magazine of 'The Sultans' a little while ago, and has just written up the back story on how some images taken in India led to his project on older Turkish men. Make some tea and check out parts 1 and 2.

From 'The Sultans' © Dirk Anschütz

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"Few things in this world make sense to me. Photography, and the lyrics of a man who sounds like a muppet crooning, happen to be two exceptions. I am attracted to people who find a way to manifest their obsessive qualities into something physical. 'Carnivores and Destructors'* documents people infatuated with the pop singer Morrissey and the various dimensions of this fixation.  

Enjoying a band is an abstract idea - the individuals I chose to photograph translate this into something beyond just music and integrate these concepts into a tangible experience and way of life.  Somewhere in this self imposed isolation, comfort and safety are found, and that is what fascinates me." - Adam Krause

It isn't every day that a submission speaks to me in the way Adam Krause's did. We share a huge love of Morrissey, and with these great photographs this was an obvious feature for aCurator.


© Adam Krause  * (lyrics from 'Ouija Board Ouija Board' - Ed)

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