Karsh_Gurley_Brown_Helen_02_med.jpgHow's about this classic colour photograph of author and publisher Helen Gurley Brown taken in 1992 at the very end of Karsh's commercial career. As one of our clients said, "very 'Dallas'!"












Helen Gurley Brown © Yousuf Karsh

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Andy and Tanner © M Sharkey

Galerie de la Main de Fer is pleased to announce 'Queer Kids' by M. Sharkey, a solo exhibition of works produced over the past six years documenting gay youth in the United States. 'Queer Kids' will be on view August 31 - September 30, 2012 (coinciding with the Visa pour l'Image photo festival). An opening reception will be held on Friday, August 31st from 6 - 8 pm.

Those of you paying attention will know that I feel strongly about these.... which makes it even more irritating that nobody is paying for me to go to Perpignan. Who do you have to sleep with 'round here...

For those of you who will be there, submit your images of the show and I'll publish some here in the blog.

Updates on QK @ FB.

And because I can never get enough:



The one, the only, the super champion Bruce Davidson.


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© Wayne Lawrence

Welcome to the Bronx Riviera.

I reviewed Wayne Lawrence's Urban Beach Week, Miami, series, and interviewed him last year for Emerging Photographer. What a pleasure to engage with a young photographer who came a little later to the art and who has embraced exactly what it is they love, with marvelous results. Over the years of representing the estate of Yousuf Karsh I have learned a lot about portraits; we benefit from the connection Wayne is able to make in such a short time.

"Orchard Beach, a mile-long sliver of constructed shoreline, has long served as an oasis for generations of working-class families living in an environment defined by struggle, yet is embedded in the imagination of many as a ghetto beach carrying all the stereotypes associated with the hood. As the only beach in the Bronx, the stigma attached to Orchard is due in part to the complex history of a borough stained by a tumultuous past and loaded with racial, cultural, and socio-economic undertones. With this series, I determined to create a body of work in celebration of this community at Orchard Beach and have sought to exalt the souls who have allowed me to share their space.

I began the journey to the heart of the Riviera at a crucial point in my personal life. I was a father and wounded, having witnessed the birth of my son a few years earlier, only to experience the most profound grief a year later when my older brother David was brutally murdered. Finding a sense of community at Orchard Beach has allowed me the time and space to reflect on the importance of family and to find my voice as a photographer.
I've approached this work instinctually and see every person portrayed here as magnificent in their own way. To stand face-to-face with the souls in these images is to accept them as they are without prejudice because ultimately, we are all one.

Bearing witness to the polarities of human existence is what drives me to do this work. I am interested in examining the totality of life with all its complexities from our entry into this world as raw potential to the day we no longer exist."

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

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© Ted Morrison

You need a new website. Your glorious images deserve better.

bigflannel, creator of aCurator Magazine, has updated their super-affordable portfolio website template to include HTML5 version and it's damn sexy.

Sex sells. Buy bigflannel.

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#icedHoffee Photo of the Hoff © David Harry Stewart

Oh Happy Monday! A welcome opportunity to publish a photo of David Hasselhoff and this hysterical news item.

David Harry Stewart from the Casey stable made a photo of David Hasselhoff holding an iced coffee for Cumberland Farms. After it was sent into stores as a cut-out to highlight their yummy iced coffee, patrons started stealing David's Hoff and posing with him on Twitter. 550 have been stolen with only 20 left. The story went viral and here we are, 2012, with Hoff still making headlines.

Here's what David had to say about David.

"Working with David Hasselhoff is a blast. Super fun, super professional, and able to turn on The Hoff character on command. He closes his eyes, pauses for a moment, then Hasselhoff the man turns into meta-Hoff the character. It's amazing to watch. I would ask for more of a smile, or a surprised look, and he would just start riffing on it through his Hoff character. In between takes we would chat about surfing or Baywatch, and then when it was time to shoot, out of the skin of this really quite regular guy came the HOFF.  Such a comedian at his own expense. Love him.

The Hoff-Cumberland Farms campaign is like nothing else I have ever done. In an age where people are worried about internet copyright theft, here we have people loving these images so much, they're actually stealing them out from stores. I love it! To go into a Cumberland Farms and run out with a stolen ad shows, real dedication. Never in all the ad campaigns I have done has there been anything like this. I'm so happy that people will be able to enjoy The Hoff in the privacy of their living rooms for years to come. It is enormously flattering."

There's a long piece in the Guardian this weekend 'If we have to go with the Hoff to pay the rent, let's go with the Hoff' and below is my personal favourite Hoff moment.

Thanks to Alex Geana and the Casey crew for submitting this. You guys made my day.



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Peshawar, Pakistan, 1988 © Marissa Roth

"One Person Crying: Women and War, is a 28-year, personal global photo essay that addresses the immediate and lingering effects of war on women. In an endeavor to reflect on war from what I consider to be an under-reported perspective, the project brought me face to face with hundreds of women who endured and survived war and its ancillary experiences of loss, pain and unimaginable hardship. I traveled the world photographing, interviewing and writing down their histories, noting gestures and gruesome details, in order to document how war irrevocably changed their lives. Women are the touchstones for families and communities and are often relied upon to keep everything held together during a war or conflict. Often, there is no time for them to assess their own traumas afterwards, let alone speak of them in order to process the experience. I was compelled to put faces and give voices to the other side of war, with no judgment as to which war was worse for its victims. There is no blood or any guns in the images, just the record of lives lived with a never-ending post-war backdrop."

Marissa has launched a Kickstarter Campaign to help with the expense of producing a traveling exhibition of the work. Funding starts at $1 - rewards start at only $25 - lend a hand?

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

"The consequences of war for women in countries, cultures and communities that are directly affected by it, have often been overlooked. My main hope for this project is to show that war doesn't discriminate how it metes out pain or suffering, that women are basically the same everywhere in how they endure war and live with its aftermath into their post-war lives. I also hope that this project inspires dialog and activism, in order to bring on-the-ground psychological and social support to these war-impacted women.

Addressing this subject started in response to immediate political and social events that I covered as a photojournalist starting in the late 1980's. After 10 years, I formalized it into a documentary project and continued it from that perspective. In 2009, it was during a trip to Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, that I fully understood the deeper motivation for this work. My parents were Holocaust refugees and my paternal grandparents, and great-grandmother were killed in a 1942 massacre in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. On the final day of that trip, I found my grandparents' former home, and also found their names on a memorial plaque by the Danube River, dedicated to the numerous massacre victims. It felt like I had found them for the first time.

In March/April of 2012, I went to Vietnam for the first time, in order to finally conclude the arc of the project. The war in Vietnam was my coming-of-age war and greatly influenced my formative years, not only as a person and activist, but also as a photographer."

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Vivienne © Leland Bobbé

Leland Bobbé's half-drag series is getting published around the world! The aCurator favourite (see here and here) has developed a community around this work and people just love it.

"These images are part of an ongoing series of portraits of drag queens in half-drag. With this series my intention is to capture both the male and the alter-ego female side of these subjects in one image. Through the power of hair and makeup these men are able to completely transform themselves and find their female side while simultaneously showing their male side. These are composed in camera and are not two separate images joined together."

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Pusse

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Sabel

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Honey

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Roxy. All images © Leland Bobbé

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Apollo 11 crew, 1969 © Yousuf Karsh

It's the anniversary of these chaps landing on the moon - Michael Collins, Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin and Neil Armstrong, by the master, Yousuf Karsh.

Maybe one day we'll play "Who did Karsh NOT photograph?"

Saw Buzz once in a hotel in St. Thomas. He was wearing a black shirt patterned with little planets.

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© Marika Dee

Marika Dee submitted her latest personal project. I myself have learned something...  "In recent years, several thousands of people, many belonging to the Roma, Ashkali or Egyptian (RAE) community, have been forcibly returned to Kosovo by western European countries. Germany is one of the countries expelling RAE families that have been living there for a long time, often 15 years or more. The deportations take place in the framework of a "readmission agreement" that Germany concluded with Kosovo, the latter being under political pressure to accept. The deportations were heavily criticized by several NGO's, the Council of Europe and UNICEF.  Most of the children were not only brought up in Germany but were born there as well. In Kosovo the families fall into a marginal existence and the children feel uprooted. In the coming years an estimated 12,000 people will be returned by Germany, half of them children.

Over the course of last year I traveled several times to Kosovo to document the precarious daily life of a few of these families."

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All images © Marika Dee

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