Dolly_Faibyshev_meatpacking2.jpg One of the more joyful meetings I had at the ASMP Commercial Portfolio Review earlier this month was with Dolly Faibyshev. This impressive young woman has already published a book with Schiffer, 'Palm Springs Mid-Century Modern' and is one of a small handful represented by Finch and Ada.

I was drawn to her lurid series 'Meatpacking District' which Dolly describes as "...a series of garish interiors. The eye-straining color palette, sexualized furnishings, disco balls hovering over fountains and urinals made to feel like an exotic island sunset come together to create the ultimate disturbed fantasy. There is something unsettling in this space designed for fun."

All images © Dolly Faibyshev
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Karsh_Marian_Beamish.jpgLife at the Karsh archive is always fascinating, entertaining and enlightening. I was contacted recently by a woman who shared the story of her mother's sitting with Mr. Karsh.

"It would have been late '30's, early '40's - from his Sparks St. Mall studio. She used to tell us this great story about it. She had booked the appointment and it was pouring rain out, so she wore a raincoat with a hood to protect her hairdo. When she walked in, Karsh stopped her and said, "Don't move! I'm going to take your photo just like that!" But she had saved up all her money for a professional portrait, so she pooh-poohed that idea and took the raincoat off. The portrait is lovely, but she regretted her haste in later years, and thought it would have made a really interesting photograph with the raindrops glistening on her hood."

Marian Beamish by Yousuf Karsh. Thanks to Mary Pal for sharing her story.

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Afghan police officer preparing to patrol a village, Panjwa'i District, Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Photo © Louie Palu
20 x 24 inch pigment print. 2010


Honfleur Gallery presents award winning photographer Louie Palu's work, The Fighting Season, which was completed as several related studies of Kandahar and the surrounding region of Southern Afghanistan. October 2011 marks the tenth anniversary of the current conflict in Afghanistan and FotoweekDC is the perfect opportunity to showcase this timely work. The exhibit's opening reception and artist talk will open November 2nd at 6pm, a few days before the official start of this year's FotoweekDC.

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Three brothers wounded by an insurgent's bomb, Zhari District, Kandahar, Afghanistan. 2010
Photo © Louie Palu

20 x 24 inch pigment print.

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Dust and smoke on helicopter landing zone, enemy possible, Zhari District, Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Photo © Louie Palu
24 x 30 inch pigment print. 2010


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2010. A wounded soldier in a medevac helicopter after a night raid, Zhari District, Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Photo © Louie Palu
20 x 24 inch pigment print.


Many of Palu's photographs featured in this exhibition were taken in combat conditions. Palu worked independently of military units and also worked embedded while covering military operations where he spent extensive periods of time with the U.S. Army, U.S. Marines including Canadian and British combat units. In 2010 he flew on over 100 MEDEVAC missions to the front lines with the U.S. 101st Combat Aviation Brigade. - Honfleur

aCurator had the honour of meeting Louie Palu at FOTOfusion in January where we were each on panels talking about our work. At the time, we were in the only contiguous state that was without snow, which is a good reason to join us this coming January for the 17th annual FOTOfusion.

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Louise Dahl-Wolfe, 1988 © Abe Frajndlich

aCurator proudly presents images from a brand-new book by an old friend and supporter, Abe Frajndlich; 'Penelope's Hungry Eyes: Portraits of the Master Photographers' just debuted at Frankfurt Book Fair. Here we touch briefly on the dozens of portraits that Abe has made across three decades. The book is not just packed with the greats but tells a tale of a young photographer, eyes opened by the unique gig of organizing Minor White's library in 1970, finding his place in history.

"The saga began in 1988 when Peter Howe, the picture editor at Life magazine at the time, asked me to photograph the 'Grandes Dames of Photography,' influential figures like Berenice Abbot, Barbara Morgan, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, and Ruth Bernhard. In the middle of the shootings I began to feel that Howe was exercising reverse sexism, by excluding the 'old boys,' and so he gave me a green light to photograph Aaron Siskind, Harry Callahan, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Andreas Feininger, Alfred Eisenstaedt, and others; and I was on my way."

The book is in US stores as of November 1st, and on December 7th the New York Public Library will be host to a discussion between Abe; Henry Adams, author of the introductory text; and Duane Michals, one of the 101 photographers in the book.

Update: OUT NOW: Get yours

The title references Homer's 'Odyssey'

View the full screen magazine photo feature

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Head of Medusa, after Rubens


Look carefully and discover the world of Chadwick Gray & Laura Spector.

These two artists have been working with museums for many years, gaining access to storage facilities, working with the curators to find paintings (mostly 19th century female portraiture), documenting them, and Laura Spector subsequently recreating them on Chadwick Gray's body. The painting process takes between 6 and 18 hours, is then photographed and printed up to the size of the original art work, sometimes a large mural.

Employing the illusion of multistable perception the final photograph often keeps your eye wandering around and around the frame.

"The recreated paintings of these historic portraits recapture the subjects in their own moment in history. The resulting photographs reveal a unification of art combining antiquity, history and technology in a contemporary context."

Most museums seem to not want people viewing their hidden treasures. Then there's examples such as New York's Metropolitan Museum who claim they don't have a storage facility. Now, as Chadwick says, somewhat ironically they themselves have a body of work that hasn't been seen by the public. So the two award-winning artists are putting together an exhibition which will be shown initially at the Pratt MWP Arts Institute in Utica, NY and it is for this they are looking for crowd-funding to produce and frame the works. Information is available over at Kickstarter. Incidentally, Chadwick & Spector are offering one of my favorite rewards: for a pledge at a certain level, wine and cheese via Skype!

There's a TEDx lecture that's fun to watch, which includes a time-lapse video of a 15 hour painting, compressed to 45 seconds.

View the aCurator magazine full screen photo feature.
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Opening today at B. Hollyman Gallery, Austin, Texas, with a reception on the 6th, and a talk on the 13th, is Loli Kantor's 'And If A Voice Was Heard'.

"Loli Kantor reminds us of the power of the photograph; the life it breathes, the destruction it stills. In her solo exhibition, 'And If A Voice Was Heard', Kantor shows us a collection of images anchored in history, loss and survival. Balanced by a personal exploration of her own roots, Kantor documents the complexities and remnants of Jewish life in Eastern Europe after the Holocaust and a tumultuous century of the rise and fall of the Soviet era.

In 2004, Kantor traveled to Krakow, Poland to participate in a reclamation project in Plaszow, a former Nazi labor camp. It was here she began researching the whereabouts of her immediate family, many of whom had perished during the Holocaust. What ensued was a journey into Eastern Europe's narrative of destruction, death, absence and grief, revealed to her along the many trips she took to Czech Republic, Poland and Ukraine over the next three years. Using a variety of camera formats, the works were created in black and white and printed in gelatin silver. They are a poignant archive of survivors, empty synagogues, dilapidated monuments, and the faces, hands and homes of a generation old and new. Within a body of work so resonant with memory and what once was, Kantor also asks us to imagine what is to come."

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All images © Loli Kantor, courtesy of B. Hollyman Gallery

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After in the region of 700 arrests in New York City this weekend, most of us are now familiar with the Occupy Wall Street movement. Local photographer Adrian Kinloch was one of few recording the march who made it on to the Brooklyn Bridge and back without being detained.

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All images © Adrian Kinloch

More from the demo on Janette Beckman's blog.

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Laurel Aitken, aka The Godfather of Ska, at home, Leicester, 1980 © Janette Beckman

I have known Janette Beckman since the early 90s when I had the pleasure of being invited for a good rummage in her basement to unearth her colour trannies from the 1980s, which were then duped for resale at my agency. Over the years I've been amazed by the number of times I've said "JB shot that??" as I read the credits on an album cover or picked up an old copy of the Face. 

For her second aCurator feature, Janette wanted us to focus on Style. She generously scanned a selection from her negative archives, some frames of which have never been published before.

"In 1979 I was living in South London, working for a weekly music magazine. Taking the bus to work through Brixton I would see the local youths, West Indian-style suits, narrow highwater trousers and trilby hats, hanging out by the underground station. At night I would shoot bands like The Specials, Dennis Brown and The Clash. Black culture had a big influence on the punk and skinhead scenes. British youth loved Soul, Rhythm & Blues, Reggae and Ska and combined the dress styles of the musicians with their Dr Marten boots, braces, Harrington jackets and loafers. For British working class youth trying to find an identity, clothes, fashion and music went hand in hand."

After much harassment by those who know what gems she's sitting on, Janette finally caved in and became a blogger this year. Visit "Archive of Attitude" for a peek at her shots from the past three decades which she posts alongside her current work.

View the full screen magazine photo feature.

Emerge Portfolio Review June 2011 from NYCFotoWorks on Vimeo.

NYCFotoworks, November 1-3, is your chance to meet one-on-one with the cream of editors, art buyers, gallerists and agents. In June 2011, NYCFotoWorks hosted the Emerge Portfolio Review that brought more than 180 professional photographers together from all over the world to meet with 150 of the industry's top professionals.

"NYCFotoWorks was a huge success! After five meetings on the first day, my career took a complete change. Just imagine how long it would have taken me to arrange the meetings with all these significant reviewers. Impossible!"  Martin Dyrlov, Photographer, Denmark 

"NYCFotoworks has been two of the most important days of my photography career." Jeffery Tse, Photographer, Los Angeles

Use discount code JGFoto and get 5% off your review package. Don't delay, all artists are pre-screened and spots are selling out - you'll be choosing your appointments starting October 10th.

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Here's a fascinating find I made at a discount clothing store: out of the corner of my eye I spotted a photograph that looked familiar, only to realize there's a whole dress of Peter Beard photographs. The label says 'Blue Area Cashmere' and I've found one blog that lists it for sale in the Hamptons for $350. I can not find any other info but I find it hard to imagine the whole thing is ripped off. Multiple revenue streams, people!

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